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Young Millionaires
Comments () | Published July 8, 2009

Mody put his name on the waiting list for season tickets when he was 11. He finally got them last season, 22 years later. By then he had the means to lease a luxury box—and to start what he calls "a nice little shrine to the Redskins" in his basement. In a burgundy-carpeted rec room, he has autographed jerseys from Sonny Jurgensen, Art Monk, and Joe Theismann, autographed footballs from all three Super Bowl teams, and signed portraits of Gus Frerotte and Sonny Jurgensen.

The kid who watched the Redskins all those years from afar now gets invited to functions where he hangs out with players.

"When I'm around some of the players I'll have my little boy with me and I'll get his photograph with those guys," Mody says, "because I know how much it means to me now, and I hope it means as much to him when he's older."

Money has enabled Mody to acquire other luxuries, including a suite at the MCI Center and a red '97 Ferrari. He had a mini mansion built in Fairfax County, with a separate condo for his mom.

Mody also takes joy in contributing to the kinds of charities that helped him in his childhood. He gives time and money to the YMCA, to a boys' home run by Youth for Tomorrow, and to the Volunteer Emergency Families for Children program, which helps abused, runaway, and other at-risk children.

"Some of the materials around me may have improved," Mody says, "but I'd like to think I haven't changed as a person."

Signal recently signed a lease increasing its office space to 70,000 square feet--more than half the building; with that came the right to put the Signal name on the building.

When the neon sign was mounted and the day came to turn it on, Mody reserved a table across the way, at Grevey's Restaurant and Sports Bar. He gathered friends and colleagues, passed out cigars, and waited.

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Posted at 12:00 AM/ET, 07/08/2009 RSS | Print | Permalink | Comments () | Washingtonian.com Articles