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March 2012 Theater Preview
“Spamalot,” “Ah, Wilderness,” and “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” open in town this month. By Sophie Gilbert
Comments () | Published March 2, 2012

It’s your last chance to catch the Generation Me–skewering work Really Really at Signature Theatre. Photograph by Scott Suchman.

DON’T MISS

Monty Python’s Spamalot, an enjoyably silly musical interpretation of the King Arthur legend—written by Monty Python alum Eric Idle, with music by John Du Prez—was nominated for 14 Tonys, including a win for Best Musical. It plays in Washington at the Warner Theatre March 13 through 18.

Ford’s Theatre stages Sherman Edwards and Peter Stone’s Tony-winning musical 1776 , about events surrounding the signing of the Declaration of Independence, March 9 through May 19.

The Gay Men’s Chorus of Washington presents Richard O’Brien’s hammy horror musical The Rocky Horror Picture Show, at the Lisner Auditorium, with an all-male cast playing Frank-N-Furter, Janet, Brad, and Riff Raff. March 16 through 18.

Sucker Punch, Roy Williams’s drama about two friends facing each other in the boxing ring in the 1980s, debuted in London in 2010. Time Out called it “witty, angry, electrifying, and poignant.” It comes to Studio Theatre February 29 through April 8.

Arena Stage presents Eugene O’Neill’s only comedy, Ah, Wilderness!, with Rick Foucheux and Nancy Robinette as Nat and Essie Miller, William Patrick Riley as their son, Richard, and June Schreiner as the object of his affections. March 9 through April 8.

Theater J revives its sold-out 2010 production of David Ives’s New Jerusalem: The Interrogation of Baruch de Spinoza. Based on the life of the 17th-century Dutch philosopher, the show stars Alexander Strain, Michael Tolaydo, and Lawrence Redmond. February 29 through April 1.

Signature presents the latest of five new shows it’s premiering this season: Brother Russia, a rock musical by John Dempsey and Dana Rowe about a troupe of Russian actors who are inspired to create a show about Rasputin. It’s directed by Eric Schaeffer. March 6 through April 15.

Basil Twist’s Petrushka opens March 16 at Shakespeare Theatre Company’s Lansburgh Theatre and runs through March 25. Twist, an extraordinarily imaginative puppeteer, first debuted this tale of a clown who falls in love with a ballerina at Lincoln Center in 2001. This is the first of three productions he’ll be performing in the Washington area this spring.

 

ALSO NOTEWORTHY

The Keegan Theatre presents Reginald Rose’s Twelve Angry Men, March 3 through 25 at the Church Street Theatre.

Washington Improv Theater has a Fighting Improv Smackdown Tournament, March 8 through April 7.

Synetic Theater’s New Movements: Light in the Darkness runs March 8 through 25.

Bertolt Brecht’s The Life of Galileo, by Theater for the First Amendment, is at George Mason’s Center for the Arts March 22 through April 7.

Gypsies, presented by Hungary’s Katona József Theatre, is at the Kennedy Center March 15 through 17.

 

LAST CHANCE TO SEE

The Language Archive at Forum Theatre closes March 10.

Civilization (All You Can Eat) closes March 11. Read our review here.

Les Justes by WSC Avant Bard closes March 11. Read our review here.

Astro Boy and the God of Comics has been extended at Studio Theatre, but closes March 18. Read our review here.

Josephine Tonight closes at MetroStage March 18. Read our review here.

You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown closes at Olney March 18. Read our review here.

Really Really closes March 25 at Signature. Read our review here.

 

FOR THE KIDS

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day opens March 2 at Adventure Theatre.

Rapunzel opens March 15 at the Puppet Co. and runs through April 8.

 

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Posted at 09:37 AM/ET, 03/02/2012 RSS | Print | Permalink | Comments () | Washingtonian.com Blogs