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5 Things to Expect at Farmers Fishers Bakers
A sushi bar and a year-round patio are among the attractions at the revamped Georgetown waterfront spot, set to open in November. By Jessica Voelker
Comments () | Published October 2, 2012
Year-round al fresco dining will be among the attractions at the new spot. Photograph courtesy of Flickr user Farmers & Fishers.

September saw the reopening of flood-damaged Georgetown waterfront restaurants Tony & Joe’s and Nick’s Riverside Grill, and come November we should witness the debut of Farmers Fishers Bakers. Formerly known as Farmers & Fishers, the farm-to-table extravaganza is the sister restaurant to Founding Farmers¬≠, which has locations in Foggy Bottom and Potomac, Maryland.

Here, five things to expect when the restaurant reintroduces itself next month.

1) Sushi: An eight-seat, reservation-only sushi bar overseen by chef Thomas Park¬≠—an alum of Uchi in Austin, Texas—will offer nigiri, rolls, and “seafood charcuterie style plates.” Meanwhile, corporate executive chef Joe Goetze and executive chef Lisa Marie Frantz have designed the American menu, featuring thin- and thick-crust pizza along with sandwiches on crusty bread, plancha-grilled meats, and plenty of seafood.

2) Tiki drinks: Along with a customizable cocktail menu, there will be tiki-themed libations from beverage manager Jon Arroyo, including a punch bowl designed for sharing. Other things to drink: 24 rotating craft beers (displayed on a screen behind the bar), fountain drinks such as house-made sodas and malts, and blended beverages.

3) A year-round patio: The enlarged outdoor area—with views of the Potomac and the plaza’s new outdoor ice rink—will be heated and bedecked with fire pits.

4) “Micro-climates:” In addition to the sushi counter and bar area, the 9,800-square-foot space, designed by GrizForm Design Architects, will feature areas for large parties and intimate dinners alike. Decor includes commissioned artworks such as animal sculptures and “reclaimed materials” like “tractor tires, barn woods, vintage farming tools, rolling pins, and antique boat propellers,” according to press materials. Taking up part of the bar area is the Larder, an open pantry with three 12-person tables and shelves full of all things pickled and canned.

5) An early November opening: Stay tuned for an exact date, which we’ll share as soon as we can.

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  • Photosbyfar

    I love FF, I can't wait for FFB to open up!

  • Miss B

    Just serve good food in a friendly atmosphere. The servers were so snooty at lunch time. It was very unpleasant.

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