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Ten of the tastiest things we’re reading this week.
Are you sure that’s cheese you’re eating, or is it mostly wood pulp? Photograph via Shutterstock.

Wood pulp. You might not know it, but it’s what’s for dinner, at least if you’re eating shredded cheese, bottled barbecue sauce, and certain fast food. [NPR] —Ann Limpert

Crumbs is closing, but fans can relive the loved/hated dessert’s glory days with this cupcake retrospective. [Grub Street] —AL

In defense of the potato salad guy (the dude who received more than $70,000 on Kickstarter to maybe make a crowdfunded side dish). [New Yorker] —Anna Spiegel

Call it a changing of the saisons: how big-time breweries like MillerCoors can beat craft producers at their own game. [Slate] —AS

How coffee fueled the Civil War. And you thought things got tense at Starbucks during the 8 o’clock rush. [New York Times] —AS

“Crepewurst,” a waffle empanada, and more unusual World Cup food mashups. [Fast Company] —Alison Kitchens

GWAR is opening a restaurant in Richmond. Come for the culinary imaginings of rhythm guitarist-cum-chef Mike “Balsac the Jaws of Death” Derks, stay for the grotesque decor and slight chance that you may get doused in fake blood at the end of your meal. [Washington Post] —Benjamin Freed

This Week in Millennial Food Trends (US Edition): The Olive Garden’s “brand renaissance” continues apace as the Italian chain renovates its restaurants with an “updated design” featuring brighter furniture, color-splashed wall art, and an Etsy-reject restyled logo, to say nothing of new ingredients like kale. Doesn’t the Olive Garden know the best way to entice economically distressed millennials is by doubling down on the free salad and breadsticks? [Eater] —BF

This Week in Millennial Food Trends (UK Edition): Ritz Crackers, which haven’t advertised on the telly in 30 years, are returning to the airwaves with an ad campaign targeting “experience-seeking millennials,” featuring the iconic crackers being shared at raves and music festivals. Because nothing says “young and hip” like sneaking Ritz Crackers on the Tube ride to the latest Shoreditch gallery opening. [Marketing Week] —BF

An interesting look at butcher/trail blazer Nate Anda and how’s he’s changing the meat scene in DC. [Eater National] —AS

 

Posted at 04:00 PM/ET, 07/10/2014 | Permalink | Comments ()
Ten of the tastiest food stories we’re reading this week.
Beefy goodness. Photograph via Shutterstock.

Sam Sifton delves into what makes the perfect burger, whether you prefer smashed, salty diner-style patties or hulkier tavern-style mounds of beef. [New York Times] — Ann Limpert

Orange Is the New Black has the bagnut, and of course, Dominique Ansel owns the Cronut. Now, fast food outlet Carl's Jr. is getting into the breakfast pastry hybrid game, testing out the “bisnut” in some stores. Because frosting and rainbow sprinkles are just what biscuits have always needed.  [Grub Street] —AL 

“Prying tiny quail bones away from meat that was griddled until it was as dry as a week-old English muffin wasn’t very wonderful.” Ouch. Tavern on the Green, one of New York’s iconic restaurants, returns to not-so-rave reviews. [New York Times] —Anna Spiegel

Why does iced coffee cost more than hot? It isn’t the artisanal ice cubes. [Grub Street] —AS

Missed connections for a-holes. And yes, I’ve felt the same way in Chipotle many times. [New Yorker] —AS

As a born-and-bred Kentuckian who loves his bourbon, I get a giggle that Tennessee isn’t able make whiskey without having some of the Bluegrass State in it. [NPR] — Chris Campbell

Last week we opened your eyes to the healthy benefits of broccoli. Relax, now we share how to make it taste good. [NPR] — CC

This guy demands fast food workers make sandwiches the way they look in the ads. [YouTube] — CC

I'd like a Big Mac, fries, and someone to help get this knife out of my back. [Huffington Post] — CC

A study finds that people perceive food to taste better when it's arranged like an abstract painting. To me, both of these salads sort of look like someone already ate them—but the point is that presentation is everything. [The Salt] — Tanya Pai

Posted at 02:38 PM/ET, 06/26/2014 | Permalink | Comments ()
Ten of the tastiest food stories we’re reading this week.
Learn how to crack crabs like a Marylander. Photograph via Shutterstock.

Gluten-free: Love it or hate it, wheat-free eating isn’t going anywhere. [New York Times] —Anna Spiegel

Uh oh, DC restaurant owners are lawyering up. [Wall Street Journal] —AS

Forget vital organs, there’s now a “black market” for restaurant reservations. [New York Times] —AS

Cue the health-nut uprising: A recent outbreak of salmonella that has affected 21 people in 12 states has been linked to chia-seed powder. Is nothing safe? [The Salt] —Tanya Pai

Mere days after giving birth to our first child, my wife and I learn that she could/should have eaten even more fish. Not cool, FDA, not cool. [NPR] —Chris Campbell

Because we’re here to help: a primer on how to break down and eat a crab. [Huffington Post] —CC

If you’re stuck on the International Space Station, at least you can now have a good cup of coffee. [NPR] —CC 

This week in Kids Doing Funny Things With Food, watch them try to identify artisanal flavors of ice cream. [Huffington Post] —CC

This week in millennial food trends: Meet “Dom,” the voice-activated operator on the Domino’s mobile app. Because when millennials want pizza, they want to order it by talking to a disembodied voice. [USA Today] —Benjamin Freed

After a KFC franchise asked a badly injured little girl to leave, the corporate office steps in to avert a social media disaster and pay the girl’s medical bills. [Salon] —BF

Posted at 03:22 PM/ET, 06/19/2014 | Permalink | Comments ()
Ten of the tastiest food stories we’re reading this week.
Domino’s Smart Slice pizza—coming to a school cafeteria near you. Image via Shutterstock.

Famed North Dakota restaurant reviewer/internet sensation Marilyn Hagerty sends her granddaughter—who is in DC for a summer internship—to Founding Farmers. It gets a thumbs down for the lack of iced-tea refills, thumbs up for the mashed potatoes. The Diet Coke, her granddaughter reported, was “what you would expect.” [Grand Forks Herald via Eater National] —Ann Limpert

Fear not, cheese-hounds, the FDA isn’t cracking down on wooden-board-aged cheeses (which basically means all the good stuff) after all—for now at least. [Washington Post] —AL

Service might be crazy slow at this bar, but the “Bruce Lee of bartending” makes up for it with some killer moves. [Laughing Squid] —Tanya Pai

Good to know some things haven’t changed since high school: NYMag finds almost everyone lies about how much they drink. [Science of Us] —TP

The Wall Street Journal highlights local restaurateur Jeff Black’s restaurants in an interesting piece on how eateries attract early-bird diners. There’s no shame in that 5:30 seating (and it may be a better deal). [Wall Street Journal] —Anna Spiegel

Think snagging a prime 7:30 seating at Little Serow is difficult? Try one of the 11 toughest reservations in the world—including José Andrés’s MiniBar—plus tips on how to land them. [Eater National] —AS

Domino’s Pizza delivers its healthier Smart Slice to more than 3,000 American school cafeterias. Which is worse for kids, calories or blatant marketing to children? [New York Times] —AS

Guests at the Marriott Marquis grand-opening party stole 400 miniature Moscow Mule cups. For shame. [Eater DC] —AS

What I’ll be making this weekend after a trip to the farmers market: pasta and fried zucchini salad. [Smitten Kitchen] —AS

No surprises here: People drink more on New Year’s Eve, July Fourth, and Valentine’s Day than any other holidays. [Fast Company] —Alison Kitchens

Posted at 01:09 PM/ET, 06/12/2014 | Permalink | Comments ()
Ten of the tastiest food stories we’re reading this week.
Would you pay $8 for one of these ice cubes? Photograph via Shutterstock.

New York chefs reveal their favorite knives for a bevy of uses—from a $788 Korin blade for chopping octopus to the good old Wusthof chef’s knife for, well, everything else. [Grub Street] —Ann Limpert

Photographer Dan Bannino captures the ridiculous diets of Gwyneth, Beyonce, and other celebs in a series of sumptuous, gorgeously shot still lifes. [Artnet] —AL

Coravin, considered a revolutionary wine device that allows bartenders to pour glasses without removing the cork, halts sales due to exploding bottles. Better watch out; there are plenty of these systems around town. [Eater National] —Anna Spiegel

A culinary tribute to Maya Angelou. [New York Times] —AS

Late night in a Denver hotel room. Green corduroy jeans. A marijuana-laced candy bar. It’s Maureen Dowd in . . . New York Times Op-Ed Reefer Madness! [New York Times]Benjamin Freed

This Week in Millennial Food Trends: Yes, this headline actually happened: “How millennials upended America’s wine scene, one taquería at a time” [The M̶i̶l̶l̶e̶n̶n̶i̶a̶l̶ Washington Post] —BF

Water poured into a jar labeled “I hate you,” “Fear,” or “This water is a stupid jerkface” will degrade and fail to crystallize upon freezing, says noted molecular physicist Gwyneth Paltrow. What happens to water if you put it in a jar that says “Seven is a great move”? [Goop] —BF

The Salt untangles one of the enduring mysteries of the universe: What makes bacon smell so damn good? [The Salt] —Tanya Pai

For the oil baron with a truly discerning palate: “The Rise of the $8 Ice Cube.” [Priceonomics] —TP

After decades of creating travesties of American and Mexican foods, Yum!—the parent company that owns Taco Bell, Pizza Hut, and KFC—has set its sights on Vietnamese cuisine with a new banh mi shop in Dallas. The only good thing to come out of this would be if Das Racist decides to turn it into a song. [Business Insider] —TP

Posted at 03:35 PM/ET, 06/04/2014 | Permalink | Comments ()
A tasty roundup of the stuff we’re reading this week.
“Please, sir, may I have some more coffee?” Photograph via Shutterstock.

Caw-feine addict

The only thing tempering my enjoyment of this video of a parrot drinking coffee is the fact that the coffee is Starbucks. Bird, you live in hipster central—get some more discerning java tastes. [Grub Street] —Tanya Pai

Questionable drinking

Apparently Soylent doesn’t exactly taste bad, it just tastes like cardboard and Muscle Milk and grit. [New York Times] —Ann Limpert

The only thing more disturbing than the men who drink breast milk are the men who sign on to “onlythebreast.com” to buy it. [New York magazine] —Anna Spiegel

Pack your flask and go

Comic genius Amy Schumer is at it again with another TV show parody. Sorry, Chopped, Sauced kicks your ass. Bring on the brûléed Lexapro. [Comedy Central] —AL

Not-so-fast food

Yes, it’s inconvenient when your favorite fast-food joint messes up your order. But here’s a hot tip: They don’t serve Big Macs in prison. [Mental Floss] —TP 

Arby’s, that ubiquitous purveyor of mystery-meat sandwiches, is not something I would normally eat, but its social-media and advertising games are on-point. The latest: Arby’s bought 13 consecutive hours of airtime last weekend in Duluth, Minnesota, to show the entire cooking of a brisket. [Duluth News Tribune] —Benjamin Freed

You can stop fooling yourselves, people. French fries and pizza do not count as vegetables. [NPR] —Chris Campbell

Blinded by . . . 

Don’t worry, there’s science behind why you’re pouring yourself so much wine. [New York magazine] —Alison Kitchens

Also according to science, there’s an ideal way to hold a burger. [Huffington Post] —AK

App-etizers

Could this new app revolutionize the way people make restaurant reservations, or tick off the public by charging them for free tables? Or both? [Eater National] —AS

Interesting visuals

Oh, great. There’s video of a competitive eater downing two 72-ounce steaks in 15 minutes. [Eater] —BF

A travel company hired someone to recreate food from around the world . . . with Play-Doh. [FoodBeast] —CC

This week in millennial food trends

Wendy’s aggressive rebranding and revamped menu efforts are paying off with the younger set. Millennials now account for 25 percent of the chain’s customers. It’s just more proof that all that development in Northeast DC is centered on Dave Thomas Circle. [Christian Science Monitor] —BF

Posted at 02:46 PM/ET, 05/29/2014 | Permalink | Comments ()
A tasty roundup of what we’re reading this week.
Could your guacamole and margaritas be in danger with the looming lime-pocalypse? Image via Shutterstock.

Rise and Sink 

With the exception of whatever a “Yarmouth bloater” is, this breakfast menu from a second-class menu on the Titanic sounds pretty tasty. [New York Daily News] —Tanya Pai

Home Cooking Chemistry

Want to make wax-moth mousse, which has “a delicate ‘insect’ sweetness”? Line up your hazelnuts, mead, and Xanthan gum and get cracking. [Nordic Food Lab via Eater] —Ann Limpert

Your Wages in Burgers

Heat maps that correlate average hamburger prices with average hourly wages are some of the best heat maps ever created. Let it be known that the average person working in downtown DC must labor for 12 or 13 minutes to earn enough money to buy a burger at an average price of about $10. [NPR] —Benjamin Freed

Unaged Wine Masters 

How did the profile of your average top sommelier transform from the gray-haired gentleman sporting a tastevin to the hip young guy in a T-shirt and blazer? A look at how wine culture turned more youthful. [Eater] —Anna Spiegel

Lime-Pocalypse 

How New York bartenders are dealing with the rising cost of limes, from using lemon juice flavored with lime extract to cutting daiquiris and other lime-heavy drinks from the menu. [Grub Street] —TP

It gets worse: Apparently limes aren’t the only thing in short supply this year. [Bon Appétit] —TP

Pop-Culinary 

Bon App also takes a look at the various categories of food movies, reminding me that watching people eat is kinda gross (okay, unless it’s Brad Pitt). [Bon Appétit] —TP

If you think fellow diners documenting a meal with constant phone-camera flashes are annoying, check out the portable light studio “#dinnercam.” [Eater] —AS

Beyond the Bread Basket

Jeff Gordinier delves into the world of obsessive artisan bread bakers. [New York Times] —AL

Toying With Bias

I’m long past my Happy Meal days, but Slate has an interesting look (written by a high school junior!) at the gender bias of the included toys. [Slate] —TP

Not-So-Fast Foods

Taco Bell had a great first quarter; its corporate siblings—KFC and Pizza Hut—lagged behind. [Bloomberg] —BF

McDonald’s and Wendy’s are going to be left in the dust because millennials prefer Chipotle for its “food credibility,” even though the difference in the effect on one’s body between a Chipotle burrito and a Big Mac are, y’know, negligible. [Forbes] —BF

Posted at 11:30 AM/ET, 04/24/2014 | Permalink | Comments ()
A tasty roundup of what we’re reading this week.
The golden arches get the Sorkin treatment thanks to Amy Schumer. Photograph by LesPalenik/Shutterstock.

The Week in Fast Foods 

Reason #4,792 Amy Schumer is the best—her brilliant mash-up of The Newsroom and McDonald’s. [Comedy Central] —Ann Limpert 

First it was a Game of Thrones special, now they’re peddling chicken corsages for prom. KFC wins all the advertising awards. [ABC News] —Chris Campbell

Think the KFC Double Down and Domino’s fried chicken pizza is bad? Salon reminds us that things could be worse, in the form of bacon milkshakes and hot-dog-stuffed pizza crusts. [Salon] —AL

Inside the Scene 

It took ten weeks for the Game of Thrones crew to prepare all the prop food used in last Sunday’s “Purple Wedding” episode. [Vulture] —Benjamin Freed

It only took a Freedom of Information Act request for people to learn what is being served to their children in school cafeterias. You can imagine how well that turned out. [NPR] —CC

Questionable Trends

This list of hipster foods is pretty on point if you’re feeling judgy or possessive of bacon right now. [Huffington Post] —Alison Kitchens

Could Kale become the new Jake or Emma? Or at least the new Olive? [Bon Appétit]
—AL

Ever wonder where six-year-old New Yorkers hang? Nightclubs for the way-under-21 set, designed for the “next generation of electronic music fans.” [Eater National] —Anna Spiegel

Your Hosts, Mary and Jane . . .

Colorado takes pot and puns to its next logical conclusion. Say hello to a “bud and breakfast inn.” [Wall Street Journal] —CC

Local reviews 

New York Times critic Pete Wells travels to Virginia to check on the hype over chef Peter Chang’s empire. Was he impressed? Read on. [New York Times] —AS

We Fled Egypt for This? 

“Can I have a piece of your matzoh?” No, and 26 other things Jews are tired of hearing on Passover. [BuzzFeed] —AS

Unusual Perspectives 

This chicken is blue, people. [NPR] —CC

An aspiring restaurateur under the impression that there are no upscale restaurants on H Street, Northeast, vows to class up the neighborhood with “sophisticated and sexy” restaurant called Mythology Modern Chop House/Lore Lounge. Okay, fine, whatever. We all know what a chop house is, but what the hell is a “lore lounge”? [Washington Business Journal] —BF

Posted at 12:28 PM/ET, 04/17/2014 | Permalink | Comments ()
A tasty roundup of the stuff we’re reading this week.
Let's face it: most meals taste better in sandwich form. Image via Shutterstock.

Genius

Our Great Sandwich Smackdown is over (tear), so here’s your week’s dose of bready deliciousness: “15 Meals That Are Better as a Sandwich.” [BuzzFeed] —Anna Spiegel

KFC has smartly tapped into Game of Thrones with its new advertisements. [Huffington Post] —Chris Campbell 

This Week in Millennial Food Trends

Chick-fil-A wants to get a piece of that millennial market by paying more attention to grilled chicken and slightly less attention to its trademark bigotry. [Time] —Ben Freed

It’s Not Delivery, It’s Homemade 

“I am here to say: You can make pizza at home.” Sam Sifton really wants you to break out the homemade dough. The good news: It’s pretty simple. [New York Times] —AS

When Life Hands You Lemons . . . 

As a soon-to-be father, I think filming young kids eating lemons is pretty funny. [YouTube] —CC

By the Numbers 

Members of Congress argue about prices of Big Macs and the contents of the McDonald’s Dollar Menu. Democracy is a many-splendored thing. [The Fix] —BF

This chart of the most popular fruit pies looks delicious, though 100-percent rhubarb (no need to sully it with strawberry) is all I need. [NPR] —CC

I’ve enjoyed this before, but now science itself approves of marinating beef with beer. [Pacific Standard] —CC

Comedic Eating 

What happens when Mario Batali cooks dinner for comedians Kristen Wiig and Fred Armisen? Well, watch. [Eater National] —AS

Of Mice and Menus 

New York’s Dominique Ansel Bakery—home of the cronut—was briefly closed by the New York City Department of Health after a reported mouse infestation. Unfortunately for polite society, the rodents were cleared out, the bakery reopened, and Dominique Ansel is now comparing himself to Rocky Balboa. [Grub Street] —BF

Posted at 03:01 PM/ET, 04/09/2014 | Permalink | Comments ()
A tasty roundup of the stuff we’re reading this week.
March is one of the best times of the year for pizza promotions. Image via Shutterstock.

Chefs Go Cr-azy

I guess it was inevitable: the “cragel.” Next I want to see the “crocaron.” And after that the “croptart.” And please, please, please—someone give unto us the “crotzel.” [SF Weekly] —Todd Kliman

Exotic Eats

This guy will be a fool to some and a hero to many: He gave up food for Lent and is only drinking beer. [Sun News] —Chris Campbell

Good advice for those interested expand their culinary horizons: the 10 Commandments of Adventurous Eating. [Serious Eats] —Tanya Pai

Coffee-flavored profiteroles with pink icing? Sounds weird, but this video by French coffee company Carte Noire is oddly mesmerizing. [Ad Week] —Sophie Gilbert

This Week in Millennial Food Trends

Who killed the standard-issue sesame seed bun at fast-food restaurants? Who else? [The Daily Meal] —Benjamin Freed

Fighting Words!

South Carolinian Stephen Colbert bashes North Carolina’s barbecue, calling it “just shredded cardboard soaked in vinegar.” [Eater National] —Anna Spiegel

My home state of Kentucky is contributing to the war against invasive species by sending the killer fish back to their home country. No lasers are attached to their heads, sadly. [NPR] —CC

Wackaging 

A screed against the faux-intimacy and friendliness of food packaging. [Guardian] —TK

Eating and Media-ing

Move over, vegans, there’s a new food trend set to annoy the masses: egotarianism. This time the fault is with the chefs, not the diners, according to Alan Richman. [GQ] —Anna Spiegel

Huffington Post gives us 14 Signs You’re Addicted to the Food Network. One that isn’t included but should be is when the geometry of Guy Fieri’s facial hair ceases to perplex you. [Huffington Post] —SG

Bon Appétit’s brand-new dining guide to DC includes the late Fojol Bros. food truck. Oopsies. Otherwise, solid list BA. [Bon App] —SG

Screw Corkscrews 

Can you open a bottle of wine with a shoe? Yes, kinda. Can I open a bottle of wine with a steak knife? You betcha. [NPR] —SG

Litereating 

A review of a new cookbook looks at the Bloomsbury Group and its love of food. Virginia Woolf liked crème brûlée; Lytton Strachey loved “nursery food.” [Independent] —TK 

BHAgels 

Esquire rounds up 11 icky-sounding chemicals found in many common foods, to which I say: “I eat chemicals like that for BREAKFAST.” (No, really.) [Esquire] —TP

Graytinis 

The Coupe is conducting an unscientific poll—or possibly the most scientific poll ever devised—of the DC mayoral race by randomly affiliating each candidate with a cocktail. Ordering a French Bikini casts a vote for Vince Gray, while a Pomme d’Or aligns your gullet with long-shot candidate Reta Jo Lewis. For the record, the Coupe’s owner, Constantine Stavropoulos, hasn’t donated to any of the mayoral candidates, according to records with the District’s Office of Campaign Finance. [Roll Call] —BF

Eat Your Junk Food 

Farmers’ almanacs should be revised to describe March as “in like a lion, out like a pizza.” March is one of the best months for pizza-related promotional deals, according to the pizza business. [Pizza Marketplace] —BF

Is this peak burger porn? Here’s a blog that evaluates hamburgers according to their design. Yes, this is peak burger porn. [The Message Is Medium Rare] —BF

Posted at 09:37 AM/ET, 03/27/2014 | Permalink | Comments ()