Newsletters

Get Dining Out delivered to your inbox every Wednesday Morning.

While Washington’s wine elite mingled at Heart’s Delight this weekend, another tasting event beckoned twenty-something vino drinkers to DAR Hall.
By Jessica Voelker
Electropop deejay Andie Verbance drinks on the job. Photograph by Jeff Martin.

This weekend, as Washington's heavy hitters sipped some of the world's most expensive wines at the Heart's Delight auction, the next generation of drinkers were descending upon DAR Hall for Wine Riot.

Created in 2008 by a company called Second Glass, the event tours cities throughout the US and offers classes and tastings geared toward a younger set of vino swillers: Think deejays, temporary tattoos, and youth-geared company jargon like "brain juice," "die-hard experts," and "killer soundtrack." Event-goers took advantage of Second Glass's smartly devised smartphone app designed to help them tackle the trickiest part about trying hundreds of wines in one afternoon/evening: remembering what you drank. A photo booth--that must-have amenity of any Millenial-minded event--helped safeguard more memories from the vino fog.

Head to the slideshow to relive the riot.

Posted at 01:20 PM/ET, 05/07/2012 | Permalink | Comments ()
The race happens this Saturday, May 5. Here’s a roundup of goings-on and a couple of thoughts on entertaining. By Jessica Voelker
When making juleps this Derby Day, be sure to go easy on the mint muddling. Photograph courtesy of iStock.

Derby Day falls on Cinco de Mayo this year. We've already rounded up a bunch of Cinco-related bar happenings; below you'll find some of the bars offerings specials and such in honor of the race. Below that: some ideas for derby-themed parties, in case you're pondering a last-minute shindig.

Parties:
The Derby Day party at the St. Regis begins at 3 PM on Saturday. Watch the race while you sip mint juleps or an original cocktail by wine director Brent Knoll--he's created a bacon-rye Bloody Mary and a ginger Old Fashioned for the occasion. (Side note: You can also get a damn fine mint julep at the lounge at Bourbon Steak). Wear the best hat, win a free drink. Predict the winning horse, win a complimentary dessert. Predict the second-place horse, win a free cocktail. And here's the kicker: predict the first-, second-, and third-place horses in the exact order they win--the so-called "trifecta"--and you'll get dinner for two at Adour.

Meanwhile, at the Willard Hotel's Round Robin bar, a $75 entrance fee buys you access to the Bonnets and Bowties Kentucky Derby Bash. The event goes from 3 to 8 PM. In addition to specialty cocktails--including juleps made using Henry Clay's original recipe, meaning there's water added--there's a Southern buffet and a chance to win prizes. For $700 you can reserve a private ten-person table. Reserve by calling 202-637-7350.

Read More

Posted at 03:40 PM/ET, 05/03/2012 | Permalink | Comments ()
Plus: A Sweetlife Food Flashback, a Rooftop Barbecue, and a Taste of Mount Vernon. By Anna Spiegel
Snacks from Luke's Lobster should calm the crowd at the Wine Riot. Photograph by Joshua Yospyn.

Want to watch the Caps game with the Rogue 24 folks? They're reliving all the taco and hot dog glory from the Sweetlife Festival (check out the food porn here) tonight in Blagden Alley outside the restaurant. Enjoy the same "haute" dogs and carnitas tacos they served at the festival (now $6 each instead of the jacked-up venue pricing of $10). You bring a plate, a chair, and whatever you want to drink. Contact the restaurant for more details.

Read More

Posted at 02:15 PM/ET, 05/02/2012 | Permalink | Comments ()
On the eve of Washington’s most celebrity-studded occasion, someone’s got to deal with the VIPs. By Jessica Voelker
Steve Oshana at his current place of employ, Quench. Photograph by Dakota Fine.

They use us, then they lose us. This weekend, A- (also B-, C-, and D-) list celebrities will descend upon our fair city in droves for the White House Correspondents' Association Dinner and related parties, then disappear as quickly as they arrived. Once the pretty people are gone, it's our hardworking locals who will have to roll up the red carpets and repolish the ice buckets. Steve Oshana--who recently took on the role of beverage director at the forthcoming Quench in Rockville--won't be clocking in this year to service the celebs. He says he had his fill of that last year, when he was in the employ of the Jefferson Hotel.

"I don't own a television and so I don't know who celebrities are," he explains. "Managers had to come by and tell me who was who." This fact handicapped him at the Jefferson--which, according to the beverage pro, has a very clear VIP policy when it comes to celebs: Drop everything for them. But that's easier said then done when you have a full bar and the room service attendant has the night off.

Here, Oshana's star-studded account* of his worst shift ever, which occurred on the eve of the White House Correspondents' Dinner in 2011.

Read More

Posted at 03:45 PM/ET, 04/27/2012 | Permalink | Comments ()
This soon-to-open shopping-center spot aims to do it all with bespoke cocktails, cartoon brunches, and a weekly food truck lunch.
By Jessica Voelker
Twenty guests can cozy up in Quench's lounge area, where the full menu will be available. There are 50 more spots at the bar and dining area, and the outdoor patio seats 25. Photographs by Dakota Fine.

A lot of restaurants opening around Washington claim they'll have a "craft cocktail program," but what that means exactly--beyond the fact that you'll be paying $10 and up for your drinks--varies from venue to venue. Quench, a new cocktail bar and eatery opening in Rockville, is aiming high: Newbie restaurateur Michael Holstein hired barman Steve Oshana--last seen at Elisir--to run the beverage program, and has purchased a Kold-Draft ice machine, an expensive apparatus that produces large cubes that melt slowly. Bitters, infusions, and fancy cocktail accoutrements like pâté de fruit, applewood-smoked cherries, and a black tea reduction will all be made in house. Oshana says each of the 41 mixers on the list will be made to order (a lot of bars "prebatch" their drinks prior to service, then just pour them as they go), and he's insisting that the staff use jiggers to measure ingredients, creating consistent drinks every time. "We want to be at the same level as the Gibson or the Columbia Room," says Oshana. "We can't afford to get it wrong."

Read More

Posted at 01:30 PM/ET, 04/23/2012 | Permalink | Comments ()
The Shirlington wine shop reopens at a new location with a wine bar, private event space, and—hallelujah—good coffee. By Jessica Voelker
Opening a bit later than expected, the Curious Grape will debut with its winter menu. Among the dishes: this salad of baby arugula, shaved fennel, Taggiasche olives, and blood orange.

On Thursday, March 29, Shirlington wine emporium the Curious Grape reopens officially with a new wine bar, retail shop, and private event space. "We wanted everything under one roof," says co-owner Suzanne McGrath, a trained pastry chef who serves as the Grape's general manager and will be making desserts. The retail section will continue to stay global in its selection, stocking the wines McGrath believes are the best values at their price points.

The Curious Grape will open with its winter menu, which includes dishes such as chicken thigh with cannellini bean stew and braised lamb shoulder (see the slideshow for pictures of the food). McGrath says she selected executive chef Eric McKamey--who has previously toiled at Passionfish and Local 16--in part for his versatility and willingness to toy with different styles and cuisines. In addition to the regular wine-bar menu, he'll be creating meals for special events. The Curious Grape will work with diners to put out meals focused on wine regions, varietals, etc., as well as events and classes that showcase its carefully curated cheese and chocolate inventory. Public wine tasting and pairing classes will also be offered in the back dining room.

Coffee talk, after the jump.

Posted at 01:35 PM/ET, 03/28/2012 | Permalink | Comments ()
Arriving from Brooklyn (Breuckelen?), Kentucky, and California, here are a trio of new boozes to try. By Jessica Voelker
California distiller St. George has ginned up a local distribution deal. It should be in stores next month.

What with all the craft distilleries popping up everywhere, new spirits enter the Washington market all the time. One notable newcomer is Angel's Envy bourbon, made by a legend--the longtime Brown-Forman distiller and all-around gentleman Lincoln Henderson. Angel's Envy has shown up on liquor store shelves all over town,* including those at Ace Beverage, Potomac Wine & Spirits, and Harry's Reserve Liquor. While it's not likely to replace your favorite sipping bourbon, it works well in a variety of bourbon cocktails--for advice on toying with Angel's Envy at home, I'd refer you to Jeff Faile over at Fiola.

Read More

Posted at 03:55 PM/ET, 03/23/2012 | Permalink | Comments ()
It’s been years since the Bourbon Steak barman slung beers in Worcester, but the memory of one St. Patty’s shift still burns. By Jessica Voelker
Jamie MacBain, St. Patty's shift survivor. Photograph by Erik Uecke.

Jamie MacBain has a pretty classy gig over at the lounge at Bourbon Steak, Michael Mina's restaurant in Georgetown's Four Seasons. Make that two classy gigs--he also does a weekly shift at the Passenger. In his younger years, however, he put in some time slinging beers to college kids in Worcester, Massachusetts. In honor of St. Patrick's Day this weekend, MacBain shared the story of his worst shift ever, which happened to go down on one of the drunkest days of the year.

"It was my first bartending job, and it was St. Patrick's Day. It was at this steakhouse, Cactus Pete's Steakhouse & Saloon. One side was a steakhouse and on the other side was a bar separated by swinging saloon doors. Worcester loves its St. Patrick's Day. The parade would go by the restaurant and we'd take out all the stools; all the bar tables would come out. We opened at 10 AM. So it's, like, 2 PM, and the parade has gone by already. We're packed, and we have police on the exit and entrance on either side. It's standing room only--some of the people have been there since 10. And this fight breaks out at my end of the bar.

Read More

Posted at 06:00 PM/ET, 03/15/2012 | Permalink | Comments ()
In the mood for a breakfast beer? Here’s where to snag one this weekend.
By Mary Yarrison

Get at early start on your drinking at Irish Whiskey, which opens at 9 on Saturday. Photographs by Jeff Martin.

Bayou Bakery will open its patio for the first time at 8 AM Saturday and serve up Irish specials including a corned beef po' boy all day. There will also be a crawfish boil beginning at 2 and live music beginning at 6:30. All day long, lucky diners who find gold coins on the patio will be able to turn them in for prizes (think $2 pints, free beignets, and $8 pitchers).

Cafe Dupont will serve brunch beginning at 7 AM, with Taste of Ireland specials such as bangers and mash for $15, in addition to the standard food and cocktail offerings. When Bar Dupont, also in the Hotel Dupont, opens at 11:30, pop over for $10 specialty cocktails like the Peppermint Patrick, made with Jim Beam, caramel Bailey's, crème de menthe, and cream.

Capitol City Brewing Company's two locations will each tap kegs of house-made Irish red ale and Irish dry stout on Saturday; pints will go for $4. The festivities start at 11 with a corned-beef-and-cabbage lunch special, among other things, running all day.

The staff at Eamonn's has created a signature cocktail, the Eamonn's Sour Irish, made with Irish red lemonade and Powers Irish whiskey, in honor of the big day. The place will open early, around 11, to offer this and its standard fish and chips, Guinness, and Smithwick's. Hours may also stay be extended, so stopping by for round two at midnight is not out of the question.

Read More

Posted at 11:43 AM/ET, 03/15/2012 | Permalink | Comments ()
The mollusk-enhanced Revival Stout debuts in April. By Anna Spiegel

Bivalve-brewed Revival Stout. Photograph by Anna Spiegel.

Port City founder Bill Butcher’s latest project, Revival Stout, is a collaboration with Dave Svec and Brad Blymier of War Shore Oyster Company. As Butcher tells it, the War Shore guys—who farm Pungoteague Creek and Battle Creek Oysters in Virginia—approached the brewery after noticing that its products were often available at the same restaurants where they were delivering oysters. Beers and bivalves are frequently paired, so they thought, Why not get them in the same glass?

“Oyster stouts”—dark beers that incorporate oysters in the brewing process—have their origin in the early 1900s British Isles. For Revival, oyster shells are steeped in the brewing water, and then the oysters and liquor are included in the boil, where they essentially disintegrate in the process. So how does it taste? There’s a hint of salinity from the bivalves, but there’s no seafood flavor. What’s left is a rich, savory brew with a smooth texture, perhaps best matched with a raw-bar platter or smoked fish. It will be available on draft beginning April 6—at the brewery for tasting or by the growler, and at select spots around town.

Update: There’s a pre-release party at Pearl Dive/Black Jack on Saturday, March 17, from 2 to 4. The beer will be served alongside 2,000 freshly shucked War Shore bivalves. 

Posted at 11:53 AM/ET, 03/01/2012 | Permalink | Comments ()