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It’s back! Our feature Washingtoniana—where we collect your questions about Washington and do some sleuthing to find the answers—has returned. It’ll appear in this space every Thursday. Kicking it off is Claudia Bahar of Potomac, who asks: “How did Adams By Emily Leaman

Photo by Flickr user rachaelvoorhees 

Editor’s note: Washingtoniana was a monthly feature that first appeared in The Washingtonian magazine in the 1980s. It was penned by then-senior editor Lynne Cheney, wife of Vice President Dick Cheney. Subsequently written by other editors, the feature appeared on-and-off in the magazine through the mid-1990s.

In our search for Adams Morgan’s history, we tracked down Josh Gibson, the guy who literally wrote a book on the subject; the Adams Morgan resident and local historian coauthored Then & Now: Adams Morgan.

In the early 1900s, he says, the lively nightlife neighborhood we now know as Adams Morgan was known more by its geography than anything else; people simply referred to it as its cross-streets, 18th and Columbia. As a whole, it comprised parts of four other neighborhoods, including Lanier Heights to the northeast and Kalorama to the west.

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Posted at 01:34 PM/ET, 10/15/2008 | Permalink | Comments ()
In this week’s edition of Washingtoniana—our Thursday feature where we collect your questions about Washington and do some sleuthing to find the answers—we find out what the deal is with what’s below Dupont Circle. By Jesseka Kadylak
What the Dupont Underground could look like in the future.

Alejandro Salinas asks: “What is Dupont Underground? Where is the entrance located? What’s the story behind it?”

The National Capital Trolley Museum staff and the Web helped us unravel the mystery of the Underground, while members of the Arts Coalition for Dupont Underground discussed its possible reincarnation with us. Read on for the scintillating answers!

Dupont Underground is an abandoned streetcar/trolley terminal and tunnel, which is located underneath Dupont Circle but above the Metrorail tracks. Several boarded-up entrances can be seen around the circle, including spots near PNC Bank and Krispy Kreme.

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Posted at 07:37 AM/ET, 10/10/2008 | Permalink | Comments ()
In this week’s edition of Washingtoniana—our Thursday feature where we collect your questions about Washington and do some sleuthing to find the answers—we find out the significance of various bronze equestrian military statues scattered throughout the ar By Jesseka Kadylak

Photo by Flickr user dbking

“What’s the deal with the statues on horses? Is there any significance to them? I’ve heard that there’s some significance when their front leg is lifted.” - Liz Palmer

Several readers were wondering the same thing, Liz. With help from a reference librarian and good old-fashioned Internet digging, we’ve got it covered.

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Posted at 11:22 AM/ET, 10/02/2008 | Permalink | Comments ()
In this week’s edition of Washingtoniana—our Thursday feature where we collect your questions about Washington and do some sleuthing to find the answers—we get the facts on the mysterious pillar at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue, Northwest. By Emily Leaman

"While waiting at the bus stop at the southwest corner of 7th and Constitution, I’ve often wondered what might be the origins of that (sandstone?) monolith. There’s no sign or any other marker to indicate why it is there. Is it perhaps some remnant of the old B&O railroad station?" - Paul Symborski

Glad you asked, Paul! To find the answer, we put our Googling skills to the test.

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Posted at 10:54 AM/ET, 09/25/2008 | Permalink | Comments ()