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“Worn Magazine” Is Back! And With New Plans for an E-Commerce Expansion
After a year of traveling the world, editor in chief Nicole Aguirre fills us in on why she left, where she’s been, and what’s in store. By Erin Williams
Comments () | Published June 11, 2012

Remember Worn Magazine? The big, broad publication with the amazing photography that explored the ins and outs of emerging DC fashion and art, making what was once thought to be an underground scene actually legit? And remember when it ended, somewhat abrubtly, after just three issues? Well, now it’s back, and editor in chief Nicole Aguirre has reentered the DC fashion scene with a bang. “I wanted to leave the door open for whatever felt right—and I think this feels incredibly right,” she says of bringing back her publication, now with a new creative director of men’s fashion, a new international commerce site, and a readiness to embrace our changing fashion scene head on. We chatted with Aguirre, back in the city for just over a month, about where she’s been, what’s new, and what’s next.

Welcome back!

Thank you so much.

It’s been about a year since you’ve been back in Washington. Where have you been?

That’s a long, long story. I’ve been so many places! I left at the end of June last year. I was teaching photography in Spain all of July—in Madrid and Barcelona—and then I visited Asia for a couple of months. I spent time in Indonesia, and I went back to Korea to visit a friend of mine. I was in London for a time, as well. I was in Mexico. I spent some time in LA—I was doing an entrepreneurship program at UCLA right before I came back to DC.

You created and served as the editor in chief of Worn, and then you left. What took you away?

I think everyone can relate to what I’m about to say, which is that at a point in June, it was this situation where I felt like I didn’t want to be wondering “what if” forever. I didn’t want to wonder what would it have been like if I went away, so I went, and now I don’t. I learned so many things and saw so many things, and the last year really made me an even more confident person who knows exactly who I am. I needed to take that year. It was worth it for me.

What changes are in store for the new Worn?

It will be longer. We’ll have more stories. We’re also exploring other mediums in order to put across the stories we want to tell. We’re experimenting a little bit with video, and we’re collaborating with some other artists in the city. I don’t want to give away too much.

You’re also launching Worn Abroad, a new e-commerce site.

Worn Abroad is about bringing street style from cities around the world here to the US. I’m not talking about souvenirs or really high-end luxury brand products, but just the things you and I would wear on the street . . . starting on a small scale [from] Australia, Mexico, Korea, Spain, Sweden—you name it. It’s gonna launch this fall. It’s going to start out as a monthly offering, and will also include some local DC designers.

Dandies and Quaintrelles’ Eric Channing Brewer is also jumping aboard. What will he be focusing on?

He will be curating all of the men’s products on Worn Abroad. He’ll be deciding what we carry in terms of men’s stuff, but he’ll also be [envisioning] our lookbooks and editorials. He will be extremely involved in how Worn Abroad looks, in terms of the men’s side and everything that has to do with the company as a whole. He’s super involved, super hands-on, and we’re both really excited to move forward together as business partners.

How can people get involved?

Right now I’m looking for writers to contribute. In general, I want to hear what people have to say. I want to see their points of view—I want people involved, and I want them to know it’s a thing that’s accessible. If they are talented and hungry to be part of something—just get in touch with me.

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Posted at 02:00 PM/ET, 06/11/2012 RSS | Print | Permalink | Comments () | Washingtonian.com Blogs