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This is better stuff than what we saw on Halloween! By Sarah Zlotnick
It’s not the High Heel Race without a Fanta girl appearance. Photo by Dakota Fine.

Try as she might, Sandy didn’t ruin all our Halloween fun. The annual Dupont High Heel Race is one of our favorite excuses to drink in the streets longstanding DC traditions, and rather than cancel it all together in the wake of the storm, the planners simply bumped it to Thursday night, thereby giving us an excuse to continue the costumed revelry for one more evening. If you’re looking at these pics, chances are you already know the drill: Each year, drag queens don their most elaborate costumes and take to the 17th Street block between P and R streets, Northwest. After hours of pre-show strutting, participants line up, and run a hectic race in their highest heels. Who crosses the finish line first is largely irrelevant—who has the best look, however, secures eternal glory—or glory until next year’s race, at least. Click through our slideshow to determine your own winner (props to photog Dakota Fine for thoroughly—and excellently—capturing the madness). Man, we love it when the Washington weird comes out like this.

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Posted at 12:15 PM/ET, 11/02/2012 | Permalink | Comments ()
The New York import monograms itself into the hearts of DC’s social set with Prosecco and major goodie bags. By Kate Bennett
Amy Donnelly and piles of monogrammed C. Wonder goodies. Photographs by Andrew Propp.

Fill a chic dining spot with pretty ladies dressed in their early fall lunching best, offer them glasses of Prosecco and delectable poached salmon, ply them with gift bags filled with monogrammed goodies, and watch brand excitement—not to mention loyalty—take shape. At least, that was the thought behind C. Wonder’s lovely soiree at Cafe Milano, a casual, private affair held to promote the store’s opening next month at Tysons Corner. About 20 local women, most quite schooled in the art of how and where to shop (kidding aside, this was a core group of dedicated retail enthusiasts), attended the lunch, which featured touches of the label’s signature whimsy.

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Posted at 02:25 PM/ET, 10/12/2012 | Permalink | Comments ()
As modeled, of course, by some of our fave Washington style bloggers. By Sarah Zlotnick

One of our favorite just-for-fun fashion pieces is a utilitarian-style vest or jacket. Simultaneously structured and relaxed, this classic menswear-inspired piece brings a hint of vintage Americana to any outfit it tops. And, thanks to the genius styling lessons of Jenna Lyons and the J.Crew catalog, there’s almost no wrong way to wear it. Old Navy is nearly sold out of its ultra-affordable version, but Free People has a bevvy of interesting options; we also like this jacket and this vest at Rugby. This on-sale Vince Camuto option ain’t too shabby, either. Need further proof that this trendy piece deserves a spot in your wardrobe? Click through our slideshow for eight ways to style it, courtesy of some of the area’s most on-point style bloggers.

Posted at 09:30 AM/ET, 08/30/2012 | Permalink | Comments ()
The owners of Treasury give the iconic DC vintage shop a serious facelift—and we give you a sneak peek! By Sarah Zlotnick

If you grew up around DC and ever attended a theme party in the District, chances are you’ve scooped up at least one lamé dress/fringe vest at Meeps, the funky consignment shop at the southern tip of Adams Morgan (we are longstanding fans for exactly this reason). Acquired by Katerina Herodotou and Cathy Chung (pictured above), the duo behind 14th Street vintage hotspot Treasury, in November of last year, the boutique closed its doors for a major overhaul not long after. Those ladies have almost finished working their magic, though, and we were lucky enough to get a sneak peek at the freshly renovated space. Here’s a rundown of the key changes you’ll notice.

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Posted at 11:30 AM/ET, 08/14/2012 | Permalink | Comments ()
DC’s La Petite Marmoset and Butler & Claypool continue to impress with their interesting twists on brick-and-mortar retail. By Erin Keane Scott
La Petite Marmoset's Petworth showroom is filled with repurposed vintage pieces and plenty of colorful accessories. Photographs courtesy of Katherine Martinez.

Here in our nation’s capital, history is always in the making. So it’s not surprising that locals also love reaching back in time to spice up their wardrobes. The past few years have seen an explosion of amazing vintage stores, vintage-focused side projects, and pop-up shops in the area. In recent weeks, Butler & Claypool and La Petite Marmoset, two of our favorite vintage purveyors in Washington, just upped the ante by bringing an appointment-only shopping experience to the mix.

Both businesses recently opened showrooms and are using local fashion blogs and word of mouth to create buzz about their curated selections of clothing. In order to shop at either spot, you have to make an appointment and divulge a few details about what you’re looking for.

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Posted at 01:10 PM/ET, 06/28/2012 | Permalink | Comments ()
After a year of traveling the world, editor in chief Nicole Aguirre fills us in on why she left, where she’s been, and what’s in store. By Erin Williams

Remember Worn Magazine? The big, broad publication with the amazing photography that explored the ins and outs of emerging DC fashion and art, making what was once thought to be an underground scene actually legit? And remember when it ended, somewhat abrubtly, after just three issues? Well, now it’s back, and editor in chief Nicole Aguirre has reentered the DC fashion scene with a bang. “I wanted to leave the door open for whatever felt right—and I think this feels incredibly right,” she says of bringing back her publication, now with a new creative director of men’s fashion, a new international commerce site, and a readiness to embrace our changing fashion scene head on. We chatted with Aguirre, back in the city for just over a month, about where she’s been, what’s new, and what’s next.

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Posted at 02:00 PM/ET, 06/11/2012 | Permalink | Comments ()
Her brand, Miri, celebrates “downtown chic” and has its roots in the DMV.
By Natalie Grasso

The looks in Mera Anwar's Miri collection are all about juxtaposition--think rigid silhouettes with soft details, and boyish pieces done in silk chiffon. And her design concepts aren't limited to her work--the idea of contrasts has shaped her life, as well. She studied biochemistry in college, but did a 180 and went into fashion shortly after graduation. She had been making clothes for friends since she was a kid, and quickly landed a gig as a design assistant for Jasmin Santanen. Currently, Anwar keeps a studio in New York but prefers to design in her hometown of Brookville, Maryland.

"New York can be too fast-paced," she says. "In Maryland I have time to think."

We caught up with Anwar to talk about her spring/summer 2012 collection, designing in Washington, and where she looks for inspiration.

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Posted at 10:00 AM/ET, 04/20/2012 | Permalink | Comments ()
Mark your calendars for May 18: Andy Cohen is the guest of honor at Bethesda’s Front Row. By Kate Bennett

Photograph by Frank Veronsky.

He's chatty, he's sassy, he knows how to navigate a room full of table-tossing Housewives--he's Andy Cohen, and in May he's coming to Washington as the VIP guest at Front Row, Bethesda's three-day fashion and style blowout. Cohen, the producer behind fashion-centric Bravo hits like Project RunwayThe Rachel Zoe Project, and Top Design (yes, he does the Real Housewives, too) will be the celebrity eye candy at Front Row's runway show on Friday, May 18. The show, which last year featured an appearance by NYC PR guru Kelly Cutrone, is held at a stage/runway erected on Bethesda Lane; participating stores include Urban Chic, Sassanova, Ginger, Wear It Well, and Luna. Post-catwalk, Cohen plans to sign copies of his new book, appropriately titled Most Talkative.

In addition to Cohen's appearance, the three-day celebration of Bethesda fashion goodness that is Front Row will include the exclusive local screening of the documentary God Save My Shoes, an award-winning film that delves into what's behind a woman's relationship with her shoes, because you better believe there is one. With appearances by Manolo Blahnik, Dita Von Teese, Pierre Hardy, Robert Clergerie, and, yes, Christian Louboutin, God Save My Shoes has been a critical and audience favorite since its release last year. A Q&A with the producer, Thierry Daher, will follow the screening.

All told, this year's Front Row, the fourth, will feature more than 40 in-store trunk shows, a kid-focused day with activities, designer appearances, book parties, and sales galore. Final details have yet to go live, but keep checking bethesdarow.com for more info.

Posted at 12:11 AM/ET, 03/20/2012 | Permalink | Comments ()
Let two of the most preptastic bloggers we know lead the way to yacht-club fabulousness. By Sarah Zlotnick

All photographs by Katie Warren.

When it comes to fashion, Washington has a serious case of split personality disorder. From the flannel-wearing hipsters in Columbia Heights to the slick suits on K Street, each neighborhood has its own look. And where would we be if we didn’t mention the pastel-wearing prepsters of Georgetown? With this style, there’s a fine line between fabulous and costumey—and no one walks it as impeccably as law students/platonic lifemates Lauren Wynns and Van Bloys, the duo behind the fashion and lifestyle blog Necessary & Proper. Read on for their ace tips for mastering the aesthetic without looking like a popped-collar tool.

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Posted at 10:28 AM/ET, 02/24/2012 | Permalink | Comments ()
Her vintage-chic necklaces benefit children in Uganda, draw inspiration from cities all over the world, and are created right here in the District. By Laura Wainman

Sola Biu has always known two things: She wants to help kids, and she loves repurposing vintage items. Oynx Feather, the jewelry company she began in 2009 and runs out of her Union Station apartment, combines both of these passions.

“I was chatting with my girlfriends about how we all wanted to be doing something we loved but have it matter,” says the media relations coordinator of the beginnings of her jewelry line. One of Biu’s friends encouraged her to make this dream a reality, and when boutique owners started noticing the handmade necklaces she’d wear, Biu knew she’d found the perfect combination.

Nowadays, 15 percent of every Onyx Feather purchase is donated to the Invisible Children Legacy Scholarship Fund, which Biu picked for its use of creative methods to improve the lives of impoverished children in Uganda.

“They address not only a child’s immediate physical needs, but also his or her long-term needs,” says Biu of the education-based program. “That is how you change a community and help it to rebuild.”

We recently sat down with the bubbly, put-together do-gooder to discuss building a business in DC, local designers she loves, and jewelry essentials for every Washington woman. Read on for her insights.

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Posted at 01:05 PM/ET, 01/24/2012 | Permalink | Comments ()