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To Do: The Pacific Rim to the Silk Road—How to Make Exotic Cocktails
The Museum of the American Cocktail will host an educational and delicious event next week at Mie N Yu—with help from local cocktail guru Derek Brown. By sara levine
Comments () | Published September 2, 2008

We can’t think of an educational experience that could possibly be more fun than a museum devoted to cocktails. It does, in fact, exist—the Museum of the American Cocktail is inside the Southern Food and Beverage Museum in New Orleans and is currently working on setting up a permanent exhibit in New York. We’re still hoping for one on the Mall. For the time being, though, local mixologist/sommelier extraordinaire Derek Brown of Komi has teamed up with the cocktail-centric museum to offer special events around town. One of the museum’s founders is Phil Greene, a cocktail historian (and lawyer by day) who lives in Washington.

The next museum-sponsored event takes place September 9 from 6 to 7:30 PM at Mie N Yu in Georgetown. Brown and Greene will educate cocktail enthusiasts on the history of exotic cocktail ingredients and how bartenders have used them over time. Brown’s brother Tom of Cork and Mie N Yu barmaster Chris Kelley will be on hand to help demonstrate several drinks—including the Bombay Government Punch of 1964, the mai tai, the Moscow Mule, and their own original creations. They’ll also give tips on how to make out-of-the-ordinary libations at home. Naturally, this informative lesson also includes plenty of cocktail sampling.

Tickets are $50. To order online, click here or call 202-222-0948 and ask for Mike Cherner.

Mie N Yu Restaurant, 3125 M St., NW; 202-333-6122.

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Posted at 01:55 PM/ET, 09/02/2008 RSS | Print | Permalink | Comments () | Washingtonian.com Blogs