Jolie the Day Spa

If only they’d give you good reading light, a junky magazine, and a warmer goodbye, it’d be perfect.

Step inside Jolie, and you may find makeup artists, hairstylists, and clients bustling about the white lobby. The receptionists are brisk and efficient, even if you show up 15 minutes early, as I did—they whisked me into a cushy, roomy robe and escorted me to the “relaxation room.”

I took a seat at one of the glass-topped tables—wishing for an upholstered couch instead of an iron chair—and helped myself to some lemon water and a hard candy. Too bad there were no magazines, but it was too dark to read anyway.

I had opted for the $80 Body Bronzing treatment. My technician, Megan, first gave an invigorating massage with honey-salt scrubbing solution, then applied mild self-tanner all over, preserving my modesty with discreetly placed towels. Megan was extremely friendly—maybe a bit too much; I felt compelled to make conversation when I just wanted to be quiet. At least she was sheepish about plugging the self-tanner and moisturizer. Afterward, I was free to relax in the treatment room or back in the too-dark relaxing area.

Jolie has an air of professionalism mixed with comfort: Lights are low; the decor is Pottery Barn—tasteful, with lots of sage green and taupe, tasseled pillows, and brass mirrors; and the Murad products convey dermatologic validity. Sadly, after Megan’s friendliness, I found the checkout desk a little brusque.


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