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Worried About Coronavirus Scams? This Call-In Event Could Help

Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh and other leading officials will take part.

Photograph of National Law Enforcement Museum rendering courtesy of museum.
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About Coronavirus 2020

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Maryland’s top law enforcement official will join federal authorities Wednesday in helping residents steer clear of the emerging scams that have accompanied the Covid-19 pandemic.

AARP Maryland is helping to organize a teletown hall for Wednesday, April 8, at noon to provide information on how consumers can avoid being victimized by coronavirus-related swindles. The event’s panelists will include Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh, U.S. Attorney Robert K. Hur, Johns Hopkins University Vice Dean for Public Health Practice and Community Engagement Joshua Sharfstein, and Kelly Gibson of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

“While Marylanders are social distancing during the coronavirus pandemic, scammers are out to make a quick buck,” according to a press release about the event, which was distributed by the office of the U.S. Attorney for the District of Maryland. “Using robocalls, online ads and text messages to tout bogus cures and fake test kits, these bad actors are preying on people’s fears while anxiety over COVID-19 is high.”

Those interested in participating in the event should call 1-877-229-8493 at noon Wednesday, and use the access code 115393.

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Senior Writer

Luke Mullins is a senior writer at Washingtonian magazine focusing on the people and institutions that control the city’s levers of power. He has written about the Koch Brothers’ attempt to take over The Cato Institute, David Gregory’s ouster as moderator of NBC’s Meet the Press, the collapse of Washington’s Metro system, and the conflict that split apart the founders of Politico.