Inside the Patterson Mansion

The Patterson Mansion, viewed from the garden of its neighbor, the Sulgrave Club, both on Dupont Circle. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.
The Sulgrave Club, also known as the Wadsworth Mansion, is still operating as a private club for women. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.
The addition the Washington Club tacked on to the Patterson Mansion in 1965. It houses an auditorium and equally large basement. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.
Detail of the McKim, Mead & White building. They also designed the National Museum of American History. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.
After his famous flight, Charles Lindbergh came to Washington and appeared on this balcony with President Coolidge, who was using the Patterson Mansion as a temporary residence during White House renovations. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.
The grand staircase. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.
The library remains an excellent example of the style of its time. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.
A reception room at the Patterson Mansion. Much of the furniture has been removed by the Washington Club or sold at auction. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.
A peek inside the room where Charles Lindbergh stayed as a guest of President and Mrs. Coolidge. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.
The French Room, which is on the ground floor just off the entrance hall. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.
Detail of a hand-painted wall. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.
Perhaps the Patterson Mansion’s grandest room, the “banquet hall” or ballroom is 37 feet wide and 68 feet long. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.
The list of past presidents of the Washington Club is a roster of influential Washington names. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.
The view today from the second-floor balcony of the Patterson Mansion of Dupont Circle, no longer ringed with private mansions but instead with businesses and office buildings. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.

Most Popular

More from News & Politics