Here are the Top Salaries of the Largest Non-Profits in Washington

This is where some of your charitable donations end up.
Here are the Top Salaries of the Largest Non-Profits in Washington
Image via Shutterstock.

The April 15 deadline to claim charitable tax deductions brings out the best in Washingtonians: Local do-gooders gave nearly $6 billion to charities in 2012, according to the Chronicle of Philanthropy. And why not? A sizable chunk of our donations goes to our neighbors, the top executives of charities based in the area. We rounded up total compensation for the largest such organizations, according to their most recent IRS filings.

United Way Worldwide*, Alexandria

Brian Gallagher, CEO: $1,096,721
Number of employees making more than $300,000: 8

Goodwill Industries International*, Rockville

Photograph courtesy of Goodwill Industries International.

Jim Gibbons, CEO: $639,085
Number of employees making more than $300,000: 2

American National Red Cross*, DC

Photograph by Daniel Cima/American Red Cross.

Gail J. McGovern, CEO: $597,961
Number of employees making more than $300,000: 14

Marine Toys for Tots Foundation*, Triangle

Photograph by David Crotty/Newscom.

Henry P. Osman, CEO: $229,377
Number of employees making more than $300,000: 0

Salvation Army World Service Office**, Alexandria

Photograph by David Keith Photography.

Ellen Farnham, CFO: $115,017
Number of employees making more than $300,000: 0

*Data from 2013; **Data from 2012

This article appears in our April 2015 issue of Washingtonian.

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Senior Writer

Luke Mullins is a senior writer at Washingtonian magazine focusing on the people and institutions that control the city’s levers of power. He has written about the Koch Brothers’ attempt to take over The Cato Institute, David Gregory’s ouster as moderator of NBC’s Meet the Press, the collapse of Washington’s Metro system, and the conflict that split apart the founders of Politico.