Health

Bean “Cookie Dough” and Turkey Bacon: What a Fashion Blogger on a Bodybuilder Diet Eats in a Day

Former Washingtonian Style Setter Meg Biram has been blogging about fashion, beauty, and lifestyle for years, but recently she’s added a new area to her interests: CrossFit. After practicing for a year and gaining muscle, she decided to extend her lifestyle changes to her diet, which led her to Renaissance Periodization.

“My husband (a very fit guy himself) recommended that I do Renaissance Periodization (RP) if I was wanting to do something dramatic. Sounds crazy for me, but it’s actually a ‘cutting’ food program for weightlifters and body builders (or just fitness freaks), and the plan is to help you only lose fat, not muscle,” says Biram. “Since I worked so hard last year putting on muscle, I didn’t want to lose it by just eating at a calorie deficit and doing some extra cardio.”

A pretty restrictive diet, Renaissance Periodization provides followers with a list of acceptable foods to choose from, including lean proteins, veggies, and healthy fats and carbs. While Biram says she doesn’t keep to it perfectly, the diet has been working for her. Below, see what a normal day on her modified version of the diet is like.

Breakfast

All photographs courtesy Meg Biram.

“First thing I do when I get up is drink either room temperature water or warm lemon water. Then coffee with way too much cream (coffee is fine on RP, half and half not so much—but I don’t care),” says Biram. “I either eat turkey bacon and sometimes a few carrots, or I will make a quiche with egg whites, spinach, and tomatoes and eat a quarter of it for four days in a row. Basically, protein and veggies. No, I don’t love eating this every day, but I see results so I continue to do it.”

Lunch

“Again, I usually have one of two things and I just switch between them—either a smoothie that I make at home or a smoothie bowl from South Block—the PB&J smoothie bowl with added spinach and a scoop of whey protein,” says Biram. “Or I will get a custom salad from Sweetgreen with mesclun, carrots, sometimes tomatoes, almonds, parmesan crisps, and the cucumber tahini dressing. Yes to bread—I need the carbs at lunch for my workout later.”

Workout Snack

“Sometimes I’m a little hungry in the late afternoon, and I almost always workout at 5 or 6 PM, so I’ll eat something really quick before I go,” says Biram. “[I’ll eat] a few carrots dipped in non-fat Greek yogurt with ranch seasoning, an apple and peanut butter, a Fiber One bar, or some healthy cookie dough made from beans from a local girl who makes it at Union Kitchen, it’s called P.S. Snacks. I’m obsessed with it. OBSESSED.”

Dinner

“Three nights a week I get a paleo meal delivery from Power Supply (my husband gets it every night),” says Biram. “It’s always some sort of meat, vegetable, and sometimes rice or quinoa. I love how easy and healthy it is, and it’s made by local chefs so I love that I’m also supporting other DC businesses.”

Late-Night Snack

“I have a sweet tooth and I love wine. So to curb both of these cravings, I’ve found healthy alternatives, otherwise I’d eat cookies and ice cream and wine every night (I basically did for ten years). The alternatives I’ve found are drinking sparkling water all night long, starting right when I get back from the gym and throughout the evening. I usually drink two to three cans of La Croix every night,” says Biram. “For the sweet tooth, I usually have a few spoonfuls of the P.S. Snacks healthy cookie dough before I go to bed. All of the flavors are good so I rotate them. Sometimes I’ll eat one of the lighter brands of popcorn or an apple. I’m like a kid, I need something in my stomach to fall asleep.”

Have a Food Diary you’d like to share? Email ccunningham@washingtonian.com.

Consult with your doctor before beginning a new diet. Washingtonian does not endorse any diet without the supervision of a medical professional. 

Get Our Health Newsletter

How to stay fit, eat smart, and live well in Washington.

Or, see all of our newsletters. By signing up, you agree to our terms.
Associate Editor

Caroline Cunningham joined Washingtonian in 2014 after moving to the DC area from Cincinnati, where she interned and freelanced for Cincinnati Magazine and worked in content marketing. She currently resides in College Park.