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Here Are 5 Bike Capes That Will Make Your Next Wet Ride Your Best Ride

Say goodbye to soggy bottoms.

When the skies open, many European cyclists don bike capes rather than jackets—the poncho-like garments allow you to ride through nasty weather in your work clothes and arrive more or less dry. Here are five capes you might want to consider for your next wet commute:

This snazzy soft yellow cape seals out moisture with talc-finished fabric and magnetic snaps at the armholes. The cape comes in petite and tall sizes, and the line’s signature hood is fitted to optimize peripheral vision. Seabee Yellow Rain Cape, $249 at Cleverhood.

Water-resistant nylon and a drawcord hood make this a solid rainy-day go-to (and a bargain, too). The unisex cape runs 40 inches long and hits around the knee. Roll it up and toss it in your bag with the included carrying case. Outdoor Products Multi-Purpose Poncho, $30, Rei.

Known for its handmade leather saddles, Brooks England makes a variety of gear to make each ride your best ride. Its bike cape, made of waterproof nylon, features an adjustable hood to fit over your helmet and magnetic tapes to connect to your handlebar. Brooks Cambridge Stowable Rain Cape, $144 – $242, Amazon.

This hooded waterproof cape repels moisture with StormRepel DWR fabric and has a crossover zipper for added pizzazz. Side snaps prevent it from ballooning in high wind, and the zippered pocket keeps essentials dry. Bonus: It folds into a kangaroo pocket. Women’s Kona Travel Cape, $129, Eddie Bauer.  

Stay spotted in this fluorescent cape from Carradice, a UK line of biking accessories and clothing. The hideaway hood tucks into the collar and also has a reflector on the back. One size fits all for this guy. Pro-route cape, $65, Clevercycles.

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Kim Olsen
Associate Editor

Kim Olsen joined Washingtonian in 2016 after moving to DC from Pittsburgh, where she earned an MFA in nonfiction writing at the University of Pittsburgh. She lives in Alexandria.

Senior editor

Andrew Beaujon joined Washingtonian in late 2014. He was previously with the Poynter Institute, TBD.com, and Washington City Paper. His book A Bigger Field Awaits Us: The Scottish Soccer Team That Fought the Great War was published in 2018. He lives in Del Ray.