News & Politics

Humane Rescue Alliance Seeks More Adopters and Foster Homes

The DC animal shelter anticipates coronavirus will lead to an increase in surrendered pets.

Leo is one of dozens of animals up for adoption at the Humane Rescue Alliance. All photos courtesy of the Humane Rescue Alliance.
Coronavirus 2020

About Coronavirus 2020

Washingtonian is keeping you up to date on the coronavirus around DC.

Humane Rescue Alliance, Washington’s largest animal welfare organization, is putting out the call for adopters and foster homes, as it prepares for an uptick in surrendered pets and a decrease in staffing within its two shelters. As the novel coronavirus threatens both the local economy and people’s health, the group anticipates more pet owners will be unable to continue caring for their animals.

“Generally, we are used to seeing increased intake when the economy declines, so that is a reality of what’s happening right now,” says the organization’s media relations manager, Sam Miller.

Miller says the Humane Rescue Alliance plans to open its two DC shelters to adopters as usual this week (the shelters are always closed on Monday). However, only serious adopters who are prepared to take an animal home the same day should come in. “For those who are unable to adopt, we’re encouraging people to sign up to foster,” she says.

Certainly, a lot of humans social-distancing from one another right now could benefit from the companionship of a four-legged best friend. Here are several currently looking for homes.

Calvin
Eva Longoria.
Francis.
Frito.
Goldie.
Josie.
Kiko.
Patches.
Power.
Prince.
Sasha.
Scrappy.
Tanya.
Wally.
Callie.
Fergus.

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Senior Editor

Marisa M. Kashino joined Washingtonian in 2009 as a staff writer, and became a senior editor in 2014. She oversees the magazine’s real estate and home design coverage, and writes long-form feature stories. She was a 2020 Livingston Award finalist for her two-part investigation into a possible wrongful conviction stemming from a murder in rural Virginia. Kashino lives in Northeast DC.

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