News & Politics

The Latest Marjorie Taylor Greene Dust-Up Shows that Capitol Hill Isn’t Very Good at Giving Someone the Silent Treatment

The freshman congresswoman displayed an anti-transgender sign outside her office Wednesday.

Photograph by Arend Vermazeren via Flickr.

It’s a tale as old as time. Official Washington moves to shut out someone who has done something bad, only to be sucked back in when that person goes out of their way to make headlines.

The latest case in point: Freshman Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-Ga.) Greene was stripped of her committee assignments earlier this month for espousing anti-Semitic views and advocating for political violence. Now, without any legislative power, she’s found a way to keep herself in the news. 

On Wednesday, Rep. Marie Newman (D-Ill.), whose daughter is transgender, placed a transgender pride flag outside her office, which, coincidentally, is across the hall from Greene’s. In response, Greene put up a sign saying, “There are TWO genders: MALE AND FEMALE…Trust The Science!” 

Several lawmakers were quick to condemn the poster, with Virginia Democrat Don Beyer calling Greene’s stunt “cyberbullying” and an “ugly, bigoted attack.” For her part, Newman told CNN she has “no interest” in worrying about Greene. “If she’s going to spend time running to Fedex and creating goofy signs, have at it,” she said. 

But the drama isn’t limited to the Longworth office building. On the House floor, Greene has slowed down business for two straight days by forcing a vote on a motion to adjourn. Because of social distancing rules, votes can often take up to an hour, which is time not spent debating legislation.

Given the attention she’s drawn, Greene’s efforts are clearly working. Every tweet and TV interview about her adds oxygen to the flames. Despite early efforts to give her the silent treatment, the buzz is only growing louder. The question now is, can Capitol Hill ignore her when she pulls her next stunt? If this week is any indication, the answer is probably not.

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