News & Politics

José Andrés’s World Central Kitchen Launches $1 Billion Fund for Climate Disasters

The goal is to help communities better respond to climate disaster events.

The chef with a hot meal and a helicopter in the Bahamas. Photo courtesy of World Central Kitchen.

José Andrés’s non-profit World Central Kitchen has started a $1 billion fund to help communities impacted by the ongoing climate crisis. Dubbed the Climate Disaster Fund, it will fund efforts to strengthen preparation for impending calamities with a focus on feeding those affected by weather disasters. Bloomberg first reported the news.

The fund will launch initiatives that give communities the tools to better respond to climate disaster events. Those initiatives include the establishment of more Community Relief Centers, investing in local food networks, and launching a program that teaches the ins and outs of setting up a food-centric relief operation.

First up for the fund: putting $50 million towards feeding communities recovering from weather disasters. The allocation is a continuation of World Central Kitchen’s previous work; the non-profit went to Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria in 2017, fed evacuees during last year’s wildfires in Northern California, and served meals in Haiti when an earthquake hit the island in August.

Some of the $50 million comes from the $100 million award Jeff Bezos conferred on the humanitarian chef following the Blue Origin space launch. World Central Kitchen CEO Nate Mook told Washingtonian in July that the cash could potentially go towards generating systemic solutions to end global hunger, expanding the use of clean-cooking around the world, and broadening the non-profits presence to new locations.

 

 

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Daniella Byck
Assistant Editor

Daniella Byck joined Washingtonian in August 2018. She is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she studied journalism and digital culture.