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It’s Dallas Week in DC, and There Are Still Plenty of WFT Tickets Available

Believe it or not, you can still grab the once-coveted tickets.

The Washington Football Team vs. Dallas Cowboys at FedEx Field, Landover, Maryland, October 25, 2020. Photo courtesy of All-Pro Reels Photography)

It’s Dallas Week, aka the week before the Washington Football Team takes on its biggest rival: the Dallas Cowboys. Once upon a time, back when tickets to even the team’s most insignificant games were hard to come by, tickets games against the dreaded Cowboys were even more scarce. Not so this year.

According to the WFT’s website, plenty of seats (and standing room tickets) are still available. Would-be spectators can either purchase a standing room ticket for $99 or buy seats for anywhere between $385-$501 on Ticketmaster or the team’s website.

Even after two decades of football futility, old-time Washingtonians might be amazed at the choice.  Back in the day, fans would have to get on years-long waitlist for season tickets, which were essentially the only way to go. But that was when the WFT was still good.

In recent years, the spectacle of empty seats at FedEx Field has been explained, in part, by the team’s lackluster on-field performance. But this year, that excuse is less valid. The WFT is on a four-game winning streak and the battle with Dallas is actually important for the playoffs.

Is it Covid? Or more evidence that the WFT has lost its hold on the DMV’s imagination for reasons unrelated to their place in the standings? Anyone interested in investigating can probably show up at the game to do more research; there’s still room.

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Damare Baker
Assistant Editor

Before becoming an assistant editor, Damare Baker started out as an editorial fellow for Washingtonian. She has previously written for Voice of America and The Hill. She is a graduate of Georgetown University, where she studied international relations, Korean, and journalism.