"Whiskey Camp" at Mount Vernon

Three miles from Mount Vernon, the fully restored distillery and gristmill that belonged to George Washington. More than 4,000 pounds of barley were sent to Mount Vernon from Scotland. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.

Visiting from Scotland to make some fine rye whiskey, master distillers John Campbell of Laphroaig, David Blackmore of Ardbeg, and Bill Lumsden of Glenmorangie. They were joined by Andy Cant of Cardhu and David Pickerell, who is Mount Vernon’s master distiller. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.

More than 4,000 pounds of barley were sent to Mount Vernon from Scotland. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.

Preparing the milling process at the gristmill. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.

The grinding of the millstone produces a fine powder that will then be fermented in hot water. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.

The fermentation tub, where the mash is produced. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.

Pickerell pours additional whiskey—leftover “heads” and “tails”—into the kiln with the mash for a new batch of rye. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.

The fire beneath the still is constantly and carefully tended. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.

When the mash has been processed from gas into liquid, it pours out in a steady stream. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.

David Pickerell measures the alcohol level of the new whiskey. The first batch was 82.5 proof, and then leveled off a little. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.

Bill Lumsden pours the “top”—or the first portion of fresh whiskey—into a jug. It will later be blended in as a fresh batch of whiskey is distilled. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.

A newly corked barrel of freshly made whiskey that will be stored away at Mount Vernon to age for three years. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.

Most Popular

More from News & Politics