Mini-Golf at the National Building Museum

Not your mother’s mini-golf. This green-course hole is called Urban Pinball. It was designed and built by Kube Architecture and the Madden Corporation. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.

The green course’s third hole is called Holograph Hole. It’s designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.

Hole six on the blue course, from Inscape Publico and Glass Construction, is called Outsmart the Grid. The golf ball generates power and triggers a light show. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.

This hole, the first in the blue course, is called Mount Vernon Triangulation and pays homage to the city’s Mount Vernon Triangle neighborhood. It was designed by E/L Studio and built by Think Make Build, Flor, and Independent Custom Metalworks. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.

The Future’s Looking Up is a hole designed by Bonstra/Haresign Architects to make players think about the importance of green space on the city’s rooftops. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.

This hole, the seventh on the blue course, celebrates kids and creativity, according to the designer and builder, Hargrove. It’s called Imagination Powers the Future. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.

How’s this for a challenge? Ledoux for Two is the name because it allows two players to shoot at the same time, a race that relates to the “un-sidedness” of a sphere. That’s the explanation from designer and builder District Design. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.

At the entrance to the exhibition, located in a corner of the National Building Museum, visitors pay $5 each to play the two courses with colorful balls and clubs. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.

For before or after mini-golf, Hill Country restaurant has set up a “backyard barbecue” on the National Building Museum lawn, complete with hay bales, picnic tables, and a white picket fence. Photograph by Carol Ross Joynt.

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