Things to Do

Things to Do in DC This Week July 13-15: Taylor Swift, Bastille Day, and Dancing Cranes

Here are the best events around town.
Guys, it's T-Swift time. Photograph by Jun Sato/Getty Images.

MONDAY, JULY 13

MUSIC: Battling a case of the Mondays? Shake it off, and splurge on tickets for one of today’s biggest names in music. Taylor Swift brings her 1989 World Tour and her, um, “sick beat” to Nationals Park for two nights. Tickets are mostly sold out, but some are still available on StubHub. 7 PM, $148 to $1,725.

TUESDAY, JULY 14

BALLET: The dancers of the National Ballet of China, a company that’s been around for more than half a century, fuse western and traditional Chinese ballet in Peony Pavilion–based on the 16th century opera. The performance at Wolf Trap centers on star-crossed lovers who experience a mystical reunion. 8:30 PM, $20 to $65.

THEATER: Legendary comedy troupe Second City promises its signature satire in Let Them Eat Chaos, a play at Woolly Mammoth created especially for DC, featuring improv and sketches that cover everything from love and Twitter to politics and the workplace. 8 PM, $50 to $63.

CELEBRATE: It’s Bastille day! Check out Washingtonian’s list of where to celebrate the French holiday, including a party at Bistrot du Coin and Bastille Day-themed trivia at Ventnor Sports Cafe.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 15

THEATER: Silence can be loud, and it can also be pretty funny in the case of Silence: The Musical, a spoof of the 1991 hit film Silence of the Lambs. In the Studio Theatre production, FBI agent Clarice Starling tangles with Hannibal in a raunchy play described as “vivaciously vulgar” by the New York Post. 8 PM, $20 to $55.

ART: Grab a picnic basket and settle down at Milian Park (499 Massachusetts Ave., NW), where you can watch two high-rise cranes perform choreography to music. Part of the Capital Fringe Festival, the performance comes to DC via Brandon Vickerd, a Canadian artist. 8:15 PM, free.

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