Food

Here’s What Small Plates Actually Look Like at DC Restaurants

Once upon a time, small-plate dishes all came in the same basic size: small. Nowadays, the term means different things at different places.

Photo by Scott Suchman

Shrimp Crudo ($12), Maketto

Server recommends: 1–2 small plates per diner (plus 1 large plate per couple).

 

Photo by Scott Suchman
Photo by Scott Suchman

Sea Urchin With Trout Roe ($6.50), Jaleo

Server recommends: 2–4 small plates per diner.

 

Photo by Scott Suchman

Duck-Prosciutto-And-Egg Toast ($11), Bar Pilar

Server recommends: 2–3 small plates per diner.

 

Photo by Scott Suchman

Hanger Steak With Potatoes ($16), Estadio

Server recommends: 2–3 small plates per diner.

 

Photo by Scott Suchman
Photo by Scott Suchman

Khachapuri ($14), Compass Rose

Server recommends: 3–4 small plates per diner.

 

Photo by Scott Suchman

Meatballs With Eggplant Purée ($12), Kapnos Taverna

Server recommends: 3–4 small plates per diner.

 

This article appears in the February 2016 issue of Washingtonian Magazine.

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Ann Limpert
Executive Food Editor/Critic

Ann Limpert joined Washingtonian in late 2003. She was previously an editorial assistant at Entertainment Weekly and a cook in New York restaurant kitchens, and she is a graduate of the Institute of Culinary Education. She lives in Logan Circle.

Food Editor

Anna Spiegel covers the dining and drinking scene in her native DC. Prior to joining Washingtonian in 2010, she attended the French Culinary Institute and Columbia University’s MFA program in New York, and held various cooking and writing positions in NYC and in St. John, US Virgin Islands.