100 Very Best Restaurant 2016: The Ashby Inn & Restaurant

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Photo by Scott Suchman

Don’t be fooled by the well-worn beams and creaky wood flooring. The food at this 19th-century inn in the Blue Ridge foothills is thoroughly modern, thanks to chef Patrick Robinson, who recently arrived from Table in DC. Focus on his charcuterie, in the form of razor-thin duck prosciutto and earthy chicken-liver mousse with shallot jam—they pair nicely with the standout list of wines and ciders. At the same time, his kitchen dazzles with more serious fare such as roasted meats and fish. The taproom, with its crackling fireplace, is coziest in winter; the porch dining room’s sweeping meadow view calls in summer. People-watching—Ashby is a favorite hangout for the horse-country set—is fun anytime.

Don’t miss: Shrimp with fennel and sambal; chestnut soup with sherry cream; cheese boards; rockfish with thyme jus; grilled sunchokes, acorn squash, and Brussels sprouts with hazelnut emulsion; rib eye with potato pavé; banana napoleon.

See what other restaurants made our 100 Very Best Restaurants list. This article appears in our February 2016 issue of Washingtonian.

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Ann Limpert
Executive Food Editor/Critic

Ann Limpert joined Washingtonian in late 2003. She was previously an editorial assistant at Entertainment Weekly and a cook in New York restaurant kitchens, and she is a graduate of the Institute of Culinary Education. She lives in Logan Circle.

Anna Spiegel
Food Editor

Anna Spiegel covers the dining and drinking scene in her native DC. Prior to joining Washingtonian in 2010, she attended the French Culinary Institute and Columbia University’s MFA program in New York, and held various cooking and writing positions in NYC and in St. John, US Virgin Islands.