Food

Homestead Opens in Petworth with a Rooftop Bar, Family-Style Meals

Homestead Opens in Petworth with a Rooftop Bar, Family-Style Meals
Homestead, a neighborhood-oriented bar and restaurant, opens in Petworth with plenty of outdoor space. Photography by Jeff Elkins

‘For locals, by locals’ could be the tagline of Homestead, Petworth’s new neighborhood restaurant and bar. A team of native Washingtonians are behind the 175-seat space, which spreads out over three levels—and several outdoor spaces—in a nearly century-old converted row house. The venture opens Thursday.

Chef Marty Anklam's menu includes seasonal dishes like grilled salmon with citrus vinaigrette.
Chef Marty Anklam’s menu includes seasonal dishes like grilled salmon with citrus vinaigrette over risotto.

Co-owners Nic Makris and Blaine King aren’t strangers to the neighborhood concept; the duo are also behind the Blaguard in Adams Morgan, a favorite among DC sports fans and locals looking for a low-key beer. Homestead is more ambitious when it comes to the design and food, though the vibe is casual. Original touches from the 1922 structure remain, though the two-year buildout involved substantial renovations.

The team converted a nearly century-old row house into a three-level space for dining and drinking.
The team converted a nearly century-old row house into a three-level space for dining and drinking.

Chef Marty Anklam‘s menu centers around homestyle cooking. The Arlington native started at Shirlington’s Bistro Bistro in high school before joining the (culinary) CIA, and working as a sous-chef at an upscale Colorado resort. The menu, served in the 70-seat mezzanine dining room for the opening, includes seasonal comforts like Roseda beef meatloaf, crab cakes, dry-aged short ribs, and vegetable risotto. A handful of entrees can be made into family-style meals for two-to-three guests, which include a shareable salad, a main like whole roasted chicken, and three sides. Given 20 minutes notice, the kitchen can pack the spread to-go.

Entrees like dry-aged local short ribs can be ordered a la carte, or as part of a family meal for two-to-four with a salad and sides.
Entrees like local sirloin can be ordered a la carte, or as part of a family meal for two-to-four with a salad and sides.

A large draw for summer drinkers will be two outdoor patios with a total of 70 seats, plus more room to stand. Like the food menu, cocktails are meant to be wallet-friendly and accessible. Classic Manhattans and their ilk go for $10, while specialty drinks such as house juleps or pisco sours are priced at $12. A dozen beers are available by tap, plus ciders and wines.

Each level boasts a bar, where you'll find $10 classic cocktails.
Each level boasts a bar, where you’ll find $10 classic cocktails.

Initially Homestead will be open for dinner and bar hours, with brunch coming soon.

Homestead. 3911 Georgia Ave., NW. Open for dinner 5 to 10, Sunday through Thursday; 5 to 11 on Friday and Saturday. Bar hours until 1:30 am on weekdays, 2:30 am on weekends.

Local cheese and meat boards are designed for group sharing.
Local cheese and meat boards are designed for group sharing.

 

In addition to the third-level patio (pictured), outdoor seating includes a mezzanine and small balcony.
In addition to the third-level patio (pictured), outdoor seating includes a mezzanine and small balcony.
The menu sources local-when-possible, like dry-aged short ribs from Virginia's Roseda farm.
The menu sources local-when-possible, like dry-aged short ribs from Virginia’s Roseda farm.
The second level will be open for dining, and can be booked for private events.
The second level will be open for dining, and can be booked for private events.
Look for brunch to begin in a few weeks after the opening.
Look for brunch to begin in a few weeks after the opening.

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Anna Spiegel
Food Editor

Anna Spiegel covers the dining and drinking scene in her native DC. Prior to joining Washingtonian in 2010, she attended the French Culinary Institute and Columbia University’s MFA program in New York, and held various cooking and writing positions in NYC and in St. John, US Virgin Islands.