100 Very Best Restaurants: #74 – Sushi Sono

Cost:

Washington has more Japanese restaurants than ever, but we still gravitate to this tranquil stalwart. The sushi bar’s specials board boasts seasonal delicacies such as whole aji (Japanese mackerel), presented in two parts: sushi and sashimi brightened with ginger, scallions, and ponzu sauce, followed by a heady miso soup brewed with its bones. (You can also order the bones fried—they’re as addictive as chips.) Don’t dismiss rolls as Americanized diversions—the dragon maki with crunchy head-on shrimp and lobster is a star. Expensive.
Also great: Hirame (flounder with ponzu sauce); octopus and vegetables in sweet vinegar; fried agedashi tofu; tempura.

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Ann Limpert
Executive Food Editor/Critic

Ann Limpert joined Washingtonian in late 2003. She was previously an editorial assistant at Entertainment Weekly and a cook in New York restaurant kitchens, and she is a graduate of the Institute of Culinary Education. She lives in Logan Circle.

Anna Spiegel
Food Editor

Anna Spiegel covers the dining and drinking scene in her native DC. Prior to joining Washingtonian in 2010, she attended the French Culinary Institute and Columbia University’s MFA program in New York, and held various cooking and writing positions in NYC and in St. John, US Virgin Islands.

Jessica Sidman
Food Editor

Jessica Sidman covers the people and trends behind D.C.’s food and drink scene. Before joining Washingtonian in July 2016, she was Food Editor and Young & Hungry columnist at Washington City Paper. She is a Colorado native and University of Pennsylvania grad.