Squash on Fire Is Celebrating Its First Anniversary with Free Lessons and Cupcakes

It's gonna be 🔥.
Squash on Fire Is Celebrating Its First Anniversary with Free Lessons and Cupcakes

If you’ve still been meaning to try squash—the older English cousin of racquetball—now’s your chance to do so for free. This Sunday, May 20, Squash on Fire is celebrating its one-year anniversary with free lessons from the staff’s roster of world-class players. Lessons for both adults and kids start at 10AM—just walk in, pick up a racquet, and get on the court. Feeling more competitive? Experienced players can get paired with those who are around their level by signing up for a Round Robin, where $20 gets you 90 minutes of court time.

The 19,700 square foot space, designed by Mexican architect Enrique Norten, features eight courts, a locker room with showers (with towels for purchase), and a cardio area on the second level. The space also houses Upper West Side CafĂ©, a restaurant and fully-stocked bar where those who don’t enjoy whacking a tiny ball around a glass-walled court can sip Prosecco and view the activity from a barstool.

Squash was invented in England in 1830 and took off in the US in the early 1900s, but didn’t gain much popularity outside of serious athletes or the country club set until its arrival in cities in recent years, when fitness fanatics discovered that the high-intensity sport torches crazy calories (around 750 an hour for a 150-pound person, according to CalorieLab). Squash on Fire opened in DC in 2017 with the mission to make the sport accessible to everyone, so it has no membership fee—a standard, 45-minute session costs $20.

Grab those non-skid sneakers and take advantage of the free celebration (plus, cupcakes!). They day’s events start at 10:00AM and go til around 2:30PM. Squash on Fire is located at 2233 M. St, NW, in the West End.

Don’t miss a new restaurant again: Subscribe to our weekly newsletters.


Kim Olsen
Associate Editor

Kim Olsen joined Washingtonian in 2016 after moving to DC from Pittsburgh, where she earned an MFA in nonfiction writing at the University of Pittsburgh. She lives in Alexandria.