100 Very Best Restaurants: #10 – Little Serow

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The bar at Little Serow. Photograph by Scott Suchman.

This northern Thai tasting room from the Komi team hasn’t undergone any seismic shifts since it opened in 2011. The subterranean dining room still won’t take reservations, making diners line up for one of the best values in town. The seven-course, family-style menu doesn’t hold back on spicy, sour, funky flavors and almost always culminates in fall-off-the-bone pork ribs. The wine list continues to surprise with a German Gewürztraminer or Normandy cider that perfectly pairs with the food. The staff, as always, delivers fine-dining service with mom-and-pop warmth. In other words, Little Serow still knows how to play the hits, and we still can’t get enough of them. Moderate.

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Ann Limpert
Executive Food Editor/Critic

Ann Limpert joined Washingtonian in late 2003. She was previously an editorial assistant at Entertainment Weekly and a cook in New York restaurant kitchens, and she is a graduate of the Institute of Culinary Education. She lives in Logan Circle.

Anna Spiegel
Food Editor

Anna Spiegel covers the dining and drinking scene in her native DC. Prior to joining Washingtonian in 2010, she attended the French Culinary Institute and Columbia University’s MFA program in New York, and held various cooking and writing positions in NYC and in St. John, US Virgin Islands.

Jessica Sidman
Food Editor

Jessica Sidman covers the people and trends behind D.C.’s food and drink scene. Before joining Washingtonian in July 2016, she was Food Editor and Young & Hungry columnist at Washington City Paper. She is a Colorado native and University of Pennsylvania grad.