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Wallpaper Maven Kate Zaremba Is Expediting Orders and Offering Virtual Tutorials

The DC designer wants to brighten up your social isolation.

Kate Zaremba's "Muse in June" print. Photo by Zaremba.
Coronavirus 2020

About Coronavirus 2020

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Hopefully, you’re spending a lot more time at home these days, and maybe you’re noticing your decor could use a little upgrade. DC wallpaper designer Kate Zaremba is here to help.

While everyone’s social distancing, her popular line of brightly hued papers, Kate Zaremba Company, is expediting orders free of charge, so you can get to work sprucing up that home office as soon as possible. Not only that, Zaremba is offering her wallpaper-hanging expertise gratis. Customers can direct message her on Instagram or email her to set up an online chat.

The virtual tutorials are, of course, a way to put customers at ease about DIY-ing, but Zaremba says there’s something in it for her, too: “It also gives me a chance to interact with customers in a new way that feels almost essential right now — in-person, but online. It’s a lot of fun for me to give DIY tips and advice.”

She promises that first-timers really are capable of wallpapering their own space, even by themselves. However, you will need a few other supplies—such as a utility knife or box cutter, and a sponge or rag— but nothing so exotic that you can’t order it from Amazon or Home Depot. So, to keep your walls from feeling like they’re starting to close in, why not beautify them?

A hallway done up in “Pinstripe Floral.” Photo by Zaremba.
A bathroom in “Reef.” Photo courtesy of Hunte Faflik Interiors.

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Senior Editor

Marisa M. Kashino joined Washingtonian in 2009 as a staff writer, and became a senior editor in 2014. She oversees the magazine’s real estate and home design coverage, and writes long-form feature stories. She was a 2020 Livingston Award finalist for her two-part investigation into a possible wrongful conviction stemming from a murder in rural Virginia. Kashino lives in Northeast DC.

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