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UrbanStems’ New Website Won’t Let Your Boyfriend Forget Valentine’s Day

Photograph courtesy UrbanStems.

It never feels good to be the Gretchen Wieners of Valentine’s Day, so in the case that your boo isn’t all that great at remembering romantic holidays, DC flower delivery company, UrbanStems, has a creative solution.

“Since we started UrbanStems, we’ve heard from our customers that they wished they had a fun, playful way to send their loved ones a hint that they wanted to receive our flowers,” said UrbanStems cofounder Jeff Sheely in a press notice. “We listened and created sendflowersto.me–an interactive site that allows you to generate a custom hint and send it to anyone who needs a nudge.”

UrbanStems’ microsite, sendflowersto.me, allows users to gently–or not so gently; the choice is yours–remind their special someone that a flower delivery is in order. The site walks users through customizing an email message that’ll be sent to the person of their choosing. After clicking “Send Them a Hint,” users can select whether they want to send a “Suggestive Wink,” a “Timely Tip-off,” an “Expectant Stare,” or a “Loving Nudge.” Next, they choose a greeting (“Well hello, hot stuff”), a reason for the floral request (“After all, we did make a baby together…”), and pick from one of UrbanStem’s four Valentine’s Day bouquets.

Finally, users supply an address (or the “Surprise Me!” option for those who can handle waiting for a more organic romantic moment), their email address, and the email address of the one they want to “nudge.”

The author decided to test drive the site to see what it’d look like if she wanted her husband to pony up some flowers, already.

The results ranged from the sort-of sweet:

2-5-16-urban-stems-valentines-greeting-1

To the unquestionably passive aggressive:

2-5-16-urban-stems-valentines-greeting-2

The bouquets start at $35 for same-day delivery in DC, and you can send messages through the site here.

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Associate Editor

Caroline Cunningham joined Washingtonian in 2014 after moving to the DC area from Cincinnati, where she interned and freelanced for Cincinnati Magazine and worked in content marketing. She currently resides in College Park.