Food

What You Should Drink at a Spicy Thai or Ethiopian Restaurant

5 refreshing options to tame the richness and heat.

All illustrations by Phong Nguyen.

Sinh To Bo

Illustration by Phong Nguyen. Drinks
Illustration by Phong Nguyen.

What it is:Avocados, ice, and half-and-half go into this savory shake.

Good for: A cool refresher.

Try it at: Phuoc Loc Bakery & Deli (6795 Wilson Blvd., Falls Church; 703-854-1750).

Spiced Ethiopian Tea

Illustration by Phong Nguyen. Drinks
Illustration by Phong Nguyen.

What it is: Black tea with cardamom and cloves.

Good for: Curbing richness.

Try it at: Meaza (5700 Columbia Pike, Falls Church; 703-820-2870).

Inca Kola

Illustration by Phong Nguyen. Drinks
Illustration by Phong Nguyen.

What it is: A soft drink that tastes like cream soda with a hint of pineapple.

Good for: Peruvian chicken.

Try it at: Ocopa (1324 H St., NE; 202-396-1814), where bartenders mix it with pisco.

Makgeolli

Makgeolli illustration by Phong Nguyen. Drinks
Illustration by Phong Nguyen.

What it is: Unfiltered Korean rice wine with a deceivingly creamy texture—it’s fairly low in alcohol.

Good for: Fried foods.

Try it at: Mandu (1805 18th St., NW; 202-588-1540).

Singha on Ice

Illustration by Phong Nguyen. Drinks
Illustration by Phong Nguyen.

What it is: A Thai lager—drinking it on ice may seem odd, but it soothes the tongue.

Good for: Taming the spice.

Try it: Anywhere, ideally pre-chilled to slow ice-melting.

 

This article appears in our May 2016 issue of Washingtonian.

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Food Editor

Anna Spiegel covers the dining and drinking scene in her native DC. Prior to joining Washingtonian in 2010, she attended the French Culinary Institute and Columbia University’s MFA program in New York, and held various cooking and writing positions in NYC and in St. John, US Virgin Islands.