Real Estate

New Condos or Apartments Will Stretch H Street Corridor Development Eastward

With its building at 2101 Benning Road, NE, S2 Development hopes to expand the H Street Corridor. Rendering courtesy of Shawn Buehler of Bennett Frank McCarthy.

Philip and Lee Simon, of S2 Development, tell Washingtonian that they are in the design and planning phase of a residential building for 2101 Benning Road, NE, a location about six blocks east of the bars, restaurants, and retail of the H Street Corridor. The project would be the first new multifamily building constructed that far east of the development wave that has hit the area in recent years (for instance, the neighborhood is getting a Whole Foods in 2017, at 6th and H Streets, NE). The building is slated to include either 31 or 32 units, and is likely at least 16 to 18 months away from breaking ground. S2 is still determining whether the units will be rentals or for-sale.

The developers say the finally opened DC streetcar has helped make the location desirable: “There’s good value there,” says Philip Simon. “You can live five or six blocks from the heart of H Street, get on the trolley, and walk to everything on H Street for substantially less money.”

The Benning Road site is currently home to a tire shop. Though the design is in the early stages, as it’s planned now, it would include five stories and a basement level. It is the largest project to date for S2, which is working with architect Shawn Buehler of Bennett Frank McCarthy, and designer Anna Kahoe, co-owner of U Street vintage furniture shop, GoodWood. More on their partnership here.

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Senior Editor

Marisa M. Kashino joined Washingtonian in 2009 as a staff writer, and became a senior editor in 2014. She oversees the magazine’s real estate and home design coverage, and writes long-form feature stories. She was a 2020 Livingston Award finalist for her two-part investigation into a wrongful conviction stemming from a murder in rural Virginia.