100 Very Best Restaurants: #17 – Maydan

Maydan's menu spans from Tangier to Tehran and Batumi to Beirut. Photo by Jennifer Chase.

Head down an alleyway, through the unmarked arched door, and you’ll find yourself in a towering dining room bustling like a town square in Beirut or Tangier. At the center of it all, flames rise from a giant hearth cooking pistachio-crusted lamb kebabs,chermoula-marinated shrimp, and other homestyle dishes from the Caucasus and the Middle East. The best way to eat here is to pick a couple of wood-fired items—the turmeric-rubbed whole chicken is a must—and then load up on an array of vibrant salads, spreads, and condiments. Tear off a piece of warm flatbread, then mix and match the flavors. Moderate.
Also great: Beet borani; Beiruti hummus; muhamarra; labneh; Romano beans; tenderloin kebab; grilled sardines.

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Ann Limpert
Executive Food Editor/Critic

Ann Limpert joined Washingtonian in late 2003. She was previously an editorial assistant at Entertainment Weekly and a cook in New York restaurant kitchens, and she is a graduate of the Institute of Culinary Education. She lives in Logan Circle.

Anna Spiegel
Food Editor

Anna Spiegel covers the dining and drinking scene in her native DC. Prior to joining Washingtonian in 2010, she attended the French Culinary Institute and Columbia University’s MFA program in New York, and held various cooking and writing positions in NYC and in St. John, US Virgin Islands.

Jessica Sidman
Food Editor

Jessica Sidman covers the people and trends behind D.C.’s food and drink scene. Before joining Washingtonian in July 2016, she was Food Editor and Young & Hungry columnist at Washington City Paper. She is a Colorado native and University of Pennsylvania grad.