News & Politics

Wizards and Capitals Fans Can Now Attend Games

Other teams, like the Nationals, can increase fan capacity

Photo by David Tran, via iStock.

The Washington Nationals played their home opener this week to a stadium slightly filled with fans—5,000 to be exact—and now more DC teams are able to host fans. Effective immediately, the city has approved increased capacity limits for Capital One Arena, Nationals Park, and Audi Field.

Previously closed to sports buffs, Capital One Arena has been granted permission to open at ten percent capacity. The adjustment means the Wizards and Capitals could finish their seasons to a roaring—albeit a little more quietly than pre-pandemic—crowd, and the Mystics will begin playing in May with an audience of supporters at the Entertainment and Sports Arena.

There are still health provisions in place: Alcohol sales will be limited at the arena, with different cut-off times for different sports. If you’re hitting the concession stands, make sure to go before the end of the second quarter at NBA games and midway through the second period for NHL games.

Nationals Park. Photography by Flickr user <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/bereninga/9515095340/">Vincent Lim Show Chen</a>
Nationals Park. Photography by Flickr user Vincent Lim Show Chen

In addition, more fútbol fans will be able to congregate at Audi Field, home to soccer teams DC United and the Washington Spirit. The Buzzard Point stadium has been approved to increase capacity from 2,000 fans—about 10 percent capacity—to 25 percent capacity. Similarly, Nationals Park will be allowed to operate at 25 percent capacity, an increase from the 5,000 fans (about 12 percent capacity) able to attend on opening day.

 

 

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Daniella Byck
Assistant Editor

Daniella Byck joined Washingtonian in August 2018. She is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she studied journalism and digital culture.