News & Politics

A Former BYT Staffer Is Starting a New DC Arts and Culture Site for Millennial Parents

Recommend If You Like launches today with a special focus on kid-friendly events that are actually fun for adults.

Brandon Wetherbee is starting an online magazine for millennial parents. Photograph by Kelsey Snell.

Brandon Wetherbee has been covering the DC arts scene for years with his own podcast You, Me, Them, Everybody and more recently as managing editor of the publication/events organization, Brightest Young Things, which folded earlier this year. Now, he’s kicking off his own online magazine focused on the DC arts scene called Recommend If You Like.

The hope is to have something for everybody to find and enjoy around town, but there’s a particular area that Wetherbee is focusing on, too: finding kid-friendly events that are actually fun for adults. As a millennial parent, Wetherbee, who is married to NPR Congressional reporter Kelsey Snell, felt like there was a lack of programming for parents like him. “I’m making something for people that happen to have kids but still like all the things that they liked before they had kids,” he says. “I don’t say we’re like a parenting site or anything like that—we acknowledge the existence of children and try not to pretend that the world exists without them.”

Wetherbee’s also planning to create a newsletter to help connect readers with stories about artists and creatives in the area and recommendations, of course, for ways to have fun. The Recommend If You Like site went live today with ten stories, including an interview with Beyoncé impersonator Riley Knoxx and a list of tips for the parents of skater kids. Tonight Wetherbee and his team will host a launch party at the Looking Glass Lounge in Park View with various DJs.

Design by Jill Rahn.

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Web Producer/Writer

Rosa joined Washingtonian in 2016 after graduating from Mount Holyoke College. She covers arts and culture for the magazine. She’s written about anti-racism efforts at Woolly Mammoth Theatre, dinosaurs in the revamped fossil hall at the Smithsonian’s Natural History Museum, and the horrors of taking a digital detox. When she can, she performs with her family’s Puerto Rican folkloric music ensemble based in Jersey City. She lives in Adams Morgan.