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Luxury Home Sales: Big Names, Big Money
LivingSocial’s Tim O’Shaughnessy and restaurateur Mark Kuller make deals.
Finance exec Andrew Cristinzio paid $4 million for this McLean spread. Photographs by David Pipkin.
Comments () | Published November 22, 2013
Tim and Laura O’Shaughnessy’s new house has a two-story custom rear deck. Price: $1.4 million.

In DC

New-media entrepreneurs Tim and Laura O’Shaughnessy bought a four-bedroom, four-bath Victorian rowhouse near the U Street corridor for $1.4 million. It has a finished lower level with a wet bar and a two-story custom rear deck. Tim O’Shaughnessy is cofounder and CEO of the deals company LivingSocial; Laura O’Shaughnessy—daughter of Washington Post Company chairman Donald Graham—is CEO of SocialCode, a Post Company-owned advertising agency that uses social media to expand client brands.

In Virginia

Finance executive Andrew Cristinzio and his wife, Carrie, bought a six-bedroom, seven-bath Colonial in McLean for $4 million. The newly built house, on more than an acre, has a three-car garage and four fireplaces. Cristinzio is a partner at the accounting firm PricewaterhouseCoopers.

Lawyer Thomas Clare bought a five-bedroom, six-bath Colonial on North Lincoln Street in Arlington for $2.8 million. The six-year-old, 7,000-square-foot house has a cherry-paneled library, four fireplaces, and a three-car garage. Clare is a litigation partner at the DC office of Kirkland & Ellis.

Thomas Toch’s Chevy Chase home cost him $1.6 million.

In Maryland

Education expert Thomas Toch and wife Ann downsized in Chevy Chase. The couple sold a five-bedroom, five-bath home on West Kirke Street for $2.7 million. The house, a classic American foursquare, has a library and large front porch. The Tochs also bought a four-bedroom, five-bath Colonial for $1.6 million. That house originally listed for just under $2 million. A former education reporter, Toch cofounded the think tank Education Sector.

Photograph of Alma Brown by Denis Paquin/AP Images.

Perfect Timing?

Alma Brown—widow of former Democratic National Committee chairman and Secretary of Commerce Ron Brown and a onetime executive at Chevy Chase Bank—sold a two-bedroom, three-bath condo in Chevy Chase’s Parc Somerset building for $2.5 million. Her son, Michael Brown, is the former DC Council member who pleaded guilty in June to bribery; he admitted to accepting $55,000 in cash from a group of men he thought were trying to do business with the District. The businessmen were actually undercover FBI agents—and the whole thing was caught on tape.

Perhaps the sale of his mom’s condo will help pay for his legal fees, which can’t be cheap. Michael Brown’s lawyer, Brian Heberlig, is a partner at the high-profile firm Steptoe & Johnson, where he heads the white-collar criminal-defense group.

Photograph of Kuller by Scott Suchman.

Fitting Amenity

Restaurateur Mark Kuller sold a five-bedroom, five-bath Victorian-style farmhouse on Wissioming Road in Bethesda for $1.3 million. The house has an in-law suite and, according to the listing, a “world class wine cellar.” A tax lawyer, Kuller owns the DC restaurants Proof, Estadio, and Doi Moi. His personal wine collection encompasses 7,000 bottles.

Some sales information provided by American City Business Leads and Diana Hart of TTR Sotheby’s International Realty.

This article appears in the December 2013 issue of Washingtonian.

Categories:

Luxury Homes The Real Estate Market

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Posted at 10:31 AM/ET, 11/22/2013 RSS | Print | Permalink | Comments () | Washingtonian.com Blogs