News

Washington Post Kills Saturday Newsstand Edition

You can buy the "expanded Sunday" edition instead.

The Washington Post‘s Saturday print edition no longer exists for 7-Eleven customers: “We’ve expanded the Saturday product on newsstands,” a Post spokesperson tells Washingtonian. If you want a print paper that day you can buy only the “early Sunday” edition, “which has all of the content from Saturday’s paper, plus some additional content, coupons, the Magazine, TV Week and more from the Sunday paper,” the spokesperson says.

Saturday editions moved an average of 4,007 copies, the lowest day for single-copy sales of the Post, according to the Alliance for Audited Media’s most recent statistics. (Sundays sold an average of 6,561 copies, and Monday-Friday editions sold an average of 7,332.) The early Sunday edition, called a “bulldog” by old-time newspaper folk, is also popular with couponers.

The Post announced the change to readers in an editor’s note last Saturday:

This is the first week of a reformatted Early Sunday Edition of The Post. It includes all the news from the Saturday paper, along with Sunday’s Comics, Outlook, Travel, Business and Arts & Style sections. It also includes The Washington Post Magazine, TV Week and the Post Marketplace package coupons and inserts. This edition is only available at retail outlets; home delivery subscribers will continue to receive their Saturday and Sunday newspapers as expected. Our Sunday edition with up-to-date news and Sports as well as opinion pages will be available tomorrow at retail outlets. The Saturday newspaper is still available through a home delivery subscription. To subscribe visit washingtonpost.com/subscribe or call 800-999-POST (7678).

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Senior editor

Andrew Beaujon joined Washingtonian in late 2014. He was previously the news editor and lead media reporter for the Poynter Institute, arts editor for the now completely vanished TBD.com, and managing editor of Washington City Paper. He lives in Del Ray.