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5 DC Staircases That Are Just Begging to Be in Your Instagram Feed

And you can find them all in public spaces, no trespassing required.

Supreme Court staircase, photo via agranier100 on Instagram.

If you thought stairs were just for suffering, you wouldn’t be wrong. Despite the terrific disruptive technology that is the elevator, staircases somehow persist throughout this city, like decorative cockroaches. These are the beautiful, broken escalators that have caught our IG-trained eye over and over again.

View from the top. #whitehouse #eeob #tourist #dc #igdc #acreativedc #onelasttime

A photo posted by Courtney Rohrbach (@capturedbycoco) on

At the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, you’ll need an invite or to be a Trump administration staffer to pull off this post-security shot in the future. The best IG shots require risk. Here, @capturedbycoco imperils her iPhone with an over-the-bannister move that is not for the faint-of-insurance.

2 staircases > 1 staircase. Plus, waiting until 3AM to get an empty vista at one of the busiest train stations in the US demonstrates dedication.

Down the rabbit hole we go. Another world is hidden in plain sight.

A photo posted by HUNG TRAN (@hung.docx) on

The kaleidoscopic staircase at the National Gallery of Art is like a pale hall of mirrors. Here, @hung.docx uses friendship to maximum effect by posing @meekoh mid-stride and staring intently into a most riveting blank wall.

Staircase of a Supreme Nature. Fully self supporting.

A photo posted by amy (@agranieri100) on

This Supreme Court staircase is off-limits to the general public, which is basically a bonus freeing you from any obligation to climb it.

??‍♀️#emojisinthewild at #myngadc

A photo posted by Raina Regan (@raiosunshine) on

The intersecting staircases of the National Gallery of Art photograph like an M.C. Escher print. Insert a human being for scale.

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Web Producer/Writer

Rosa joined Washingtonian in 2016 after graduating from Mount Holyoke College. She covers arts and culture for the magazine. She’s written about anti-racism efforts at Woolly Mammoth Theatre, dinosaurs in the revamped fossil hall at the Smithsonian’s Natural History Museum, and the horrors of taking a digital detox. When she can, she performs with her family’s Puerto Rican folkloric music ensemble based in Jersey City. She lives in Adams Morgan.