Food

These Are the Coolest Serving Pieces in DC Restaurants

Pass the glass bee.

Restaurants in the District are getting creative with their servingware. Here are some of the most unusual food vessels we’ve seen.

Sculpted head for foie gras cake pops at Bresca. Sculpted head for foie gras cake pops at Bresca.
Glass bee for gin-and-honey cocktails at Bresca.Glass bee for gin-and-honey cocktails at Bresca.

Left: Sculpted head for foie gras cake pops at Bresca.

Right: Glass bee for gin-and-honey cocktails at Bresca.

Left: Ceramic dinosaur plate for petits fours at Minibar.Left: Ceramic dinosaur plate for petits fours at Minibar.
Tiger nautilus shell in a bed of sand for gin-and-tonics at Del Mar.Tiger nautilus shell in a bed of sand for gin-and-tonics at Del Mar.

Left: Ceramic dinosaur plate for petits fours at Minibar.

Right: Tiger nautilus shell in a bed of sand for gin-and-tonics at Del Mar.

Left: Custom-made “clothesline” for bacon at BLT Prime. Left: Custom-made “clothesline” for bacon at BLT Prime.
Glass-and-chrome coffee-and-tea siphon for oxtail consommé at Plume.Glass-and-chrome coffee-and-tea siphon for oxtail consommé at Plume.

Left: Custom-made “clothesline” for bacon at BLT Prime.

Right: Glass-and-chrome coffee-and-tea siphon for oxtail consommé at Plume.

Left: Stainless-steel coral stand for caviar at Siren.  Left: Stainless-steel coral stand for caviar at Siren.
Resin shoe for croquetas at Jaleo.Resin shoe for croquetas at Jaleo.

Left: Stainless-steel coral stand for caviar at Siren.

Right: Resin shoe for croquetas at Jaleo.

Top: Enamel street sign and Paris map for Saint-Honoré cake at Métier.Top: Enamel street sign and Paris map for Saint-Honoré cake at Métier.
Handmade porcelain sea-urchin bowl for beet meringue and caviar at Minibar.Handmade porcelain sea-urchin bowl for beet meringue and caviar at Minibar.

Top: Enamel street sign and Paris map for Saint-Honoré cake at Métier

Bottom: Handmade porcelain sea-urchin bowl for beet meringue and caviar at Minibar.

Wooden jewelry box for masa puffs at Pineapple and Pearls.Wooden jewelry box for masa puffs at Pineapple and Pearls.

Wooden jewelry box for masa puffs at Pineapple and Pearls.

This article appears in the February 2018 issue of Washingtonian.

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Ann Limpert
Executive Food Editor/Critic

Ann Limpert joined Washingtonian in late 2003. She was previously an editorial assistant at Entertainment Weekly and a cook in New York restaurant kitchens, and she is a graduate of the Institute of Culinary Education. She lives in Logan Circle.

Jessica Sidman
Food Editor

Jessica Sidman covers the people and trends behind D.C.’s food and drink scene. Before joining Washingtonian in July 2016, she was Food Editor and Young & Hungry columnist at Washington City Paper. She is a Colorado native and University of Pennsylvania grad.

Anna Spiegel
Food Editor

Anna Spiegel covers the dining and drinking scene in her native DC. Prior to joining Washingtonian in 2010, she attended the French Culinary Institute and Columbia University’s MFA program in New York, and held various cooking and writing positions in NYC and in St. John, US Virgin Islands.

Erika Huber
Editorial Fellow

Erika joined Washingtonian in September 2017. She received an English degree from Towson University and has written for Investment U and Elite Daily. After graduating, she worked in financial publishing as a copy editor. She resides in Maryland.