Food

Drink Bottomless Brunch Rosé and Other Free-Flowing Drinks Beyond Mimosas

Get creative with your daytime drinks.

Head to Compass Rose for a brunch party. Photo courtesy of Compass Rose.

Bottomless bloodys is an oxymoron (can anyone really drink more than two?). Mimosas can get monotonous. Try one of these free-flowing brunch drink deals instead.

Bottomless rosé at Tyber Creek

84 T St., NW
Think pink on the lovely 45-seat patio of this Bloomingdale haunt (also heated for year-round imbibing). All-you-can-drink draft rosé goes for $27 per person with a two hour limit. Pair your vino with an Ivy City smoked fish and bagel board or warming shakshuka.

Bottomless margaritas (and guac!) at Mission

1606 20th St., NW; 1221 Van St., SE
These sister Mexican spots in Dupont and Navy Yard throw a hedonistic brunch (within a two hour limit) with bottomless chips, salsa, guacamole, house margs, and beers in addition to the usual brunch drinks. Patrons can also get one—and only one—gratis El Jimador shot in Dupont. As the menu says: “It’s a marathon, not a sprint—please drink responsibly” (responsibly-ish?).

All-you-can-drink sangria at Boqueria

837 M St., NW; 777 Ninth St., NW
Dupont’s Spanish spot is also an all-you-can-eat-and-drink affair with unlimited tapas and red and white sangria (or mimosas) for $39 per person. The new Penn Quarter location has a slightly different menu but the same bottomless libations. 

Brunch apertivos at Ambar Clarendon

2901 Wilson Blvd., Arlington 
Both the Capitol Hill and Clarendon locations of Ivan Iricanin’s atmospheric Balkan restaurants serve all-you-can-eat-and-drink menus ($34 to $44). In Clarendon, there’s more than mimosas and bloodys, including peach bellinis with tea-infused puree, a “brunch aperitivo” (fortified wine, orange juice, and Balkan bubbly), and minty red wine punch. Note the drinks in here are 25 cents, per Virginia law.

Best bottomless brunch cocktails VA Arlington Clarendon
Ambar Clarendon. Photo by Scott Suchman

So many tallboys at Bar Charley

1825 18th St., NW
Brunch at this oft-packed Dupont bar features bottomless Narragansett tallboys (as well as traditional bloodys and mimosas). The $25 deal includes an entree like a classic American breakfast or brunch burger.

Giant Old-Fashioneds at Barrel

613 Pennsylvania Ave., SE
Bottomless old fashioneds would be dangerous, but you’ll certainly get your fill when you and at least three friends order a barrel of the whiskey cocktail ($60 per barrel). The kegged drink is a mix of Old Overholt, bitters, and simple syrup over ice. Make sure to order something to pad the stomach like chicken and waffles.

Pomegranate Prosecco at Compass Rose

1346 T St., NW
We’re fans of the brunch menu at Rose Previte’s eclectic restaurant—essentially the regular menu of global small plates plus a handful of daytime specials. In addition to regular fresh fruit mimosas, you can get bottomless Prosecco or bubbles spiked with pomegranate liqueur. 

Best bottomless brunch cocktails DC
Brunch becomes a party at Masa 14. Photo by Scott Suchman

Beers and bellinis at Masa 14

1825 14th St., NW
Restaurateur Richard Sandoval is known for all-you-can-eat-and-drink brunches at all his DC ventures (El Centro, Toro Toro). At this Latin/Asian spot, groups can camp out on the covered rooftop with lychee bellinis and lemon lagers in addition to bacon bloodys and mimosas ($39 per person including unlimited food).

Party booze at Hawthorne

1336 U St., NW
Didn’t get enough Bud Light the night before? Everyone gets a second chance at this U Street bar, which pours all-you-can-drink BLs and orange crushes as well as mimosas and bloodys with an entree ($37.99 per person). A shot is also included, because that’s definitely a good idea. 

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Food Editor

Anna Spiegel covers the dining and drinking scene in her native DC. Prior to joining Washingtonian in 2010, she attended the French Culinary Institute and Columbia University’s MFA program in New York, and held various cooking and writing positions in NYC and in St. John, US Virgin Islands.