Weddings

These Local Wedding Vendors Are Still Making Masks for People in Need—Here’s How You Can Help

Bridal boutiques, a rental company, and a caterer are among those sewing for the cause.

Photograph of Something Vintage Rental masks courtesy of Something Vintage Rentals
Coronavirus 2020

About Coronavirus 2020

Washingtonian is keeping you up to date on the coronavirus around DC.

 

Something Vintage

The Maryland rental vintage furniture store has had its team making cloth face masks for about a month, and so far they’ve donated more than 2,000 to DMV hospitals, and given materials to local volunteers to make even more. Their current in-house goal is to produce 3,000, but, they say, they’ll probably keep going even after that. In their latest effort, they’ve started a buy-one-donate-one program through which individuals and organizations can purchase a mask in sets of five or more than 100, and in response, the company will donate a matching number of masks to healthcare workers. To keep up with demand of mask purchases, says owner Dawn Crothers, the rental shop is paying additional seamstresses and laid off workers to help us fulfill orders.

 

Zoya’s Atelier

The Falls Church bridal boutique has donated more than 1,000 masks to local “medical professionals, chefs, teachers, supermarket workers, construction workers, and more” they said in an Instagram post this month. Those in need of a mask can email or message them to request one, and those able to help, can donate money towards their sewing supplies through their website

 

Love Couture Bridal

This Potomac bridal salon most recently donated 100 handmade reusable masks to the labor and delivery team at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring. This week they kicked off a buy-one-give-one initiative, and for every masked purchased, another is donated. All proceeds from the sale of masks go to funding and making more for frontline workers in need. “The supply costs were skyrocketing so this was a great way to continue our charitable efforts and help our fellow citizens, who now also need masks, “says salon owner Sandy Leone. “We couldn’t keep up with orders so we are now hiring more seamstresses to help us with mask making. Providing jobs during a time like this has been the icing on the cake!” For more info or to place an order, email info@lovecouturebridal.com.

 

Susan Gage Caterers

Susan Gage Caterers averages 150-200 masks a day, and has made 1,500 so far. “So far, we’ve been able to support local hospitals, EMS, firehouse, retirement communities, and restaurants,” says sales director Stacey Benefield. “Some of those include the following – Inova Medical Center, United Medical Center, Fort Washington Hospital, Southern Maryland Hospital Center, Suburban Hospital, NYC Health + Hospitals/Kings County, MJ Valet, Duke’s Grocery, Maxwell Park, Buck’s Fishing & Camping, Gogi Yoji & Stellina.” Need a mask? You can order one by emailing orders@susangage.com, and/or participate in the buy one/donate one program. If you’re looking for ways to help, the catering company is also accepting donations of money that will go towards mask as well as meal donations for front line workers, and fabrics that are approved by the Vanderbilt School of Medicine specifications.

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Carine’s Bridal Atelier

The Georgetown bridal boutique’s team is still cutting and sewing face masks daily, working with hospitals including Georgetown and Washington Hospital Center, Children’s Hospital, Sibley, GWUH, La Clinic del Pueblo to fulfill orders. They’ve raised money, gotten fabric, and cut patterns, but they say, they are in need of volunteer sewers to help sew more in addition to what their seamstresses are doing. 

 

 

Amy Moeller
Editor, Washingtonian Weddings

Amy leads Washingtonian Weddings and writes Style Setters for Washingtonian. Prior to joining Washingtonian in March 2016, she was the editor of Capitol File magazine in DC and before that, editor of What’s Up? Weddings in Annapolis.