Things to Do

Here’s How to Make a No-Dye Tie-Dye Sweatshirt

Tie-dye is the loungewear look of quarantine.

It seems like everyone on Instagram is tie-dying their clothes. When did this become cool again? I fought the urge to love it—and still found myself double-clicking every multi-colored hoodie I’d scroll upon. Not one to let a trend pass me by, I wanted to jump on this tie-dye thing while spending little-to-no money. That stimulus check hadn’t come in yet, you know what I mean? Just in case this was a total flop, though, I invested in this Gildan Men’s Fleece Crewneck from Amazon. A worthy purchase for only $12.  And with no dye on hand, I opted for the bleach tie-dye look, using Clorox cleaner instead. Want to try it for yourself? Here’s what you’ll need, and how to do it…

Items:

  1. A dark item of clothing
  2. Many rubber bands
  3. Bleach in any type of spray bottle
  4. Sunshine, and some patience

How to Make your Own:

  1. Find an outdoor spot and lay your clothing down flat.
  2. Using rubber bands, twist together small sections of fabric and tie bands tightly around. The more bands used, the more original color that will survive the bleaching. Regrettably, I did not use enough bands. Use more than this!
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  3. Spray bleach all over clothing. I learned that the type of nozzle doesn’t matter as long as you saturate the item with bleach. Don’t forget to spray the back!
  4. Leave clothing in a sunny spot for a few hours. I have zero patience so here’s what it looked like after 30 minutes:
  5. Cut off rubber bands. Celebrate the surprise that is your new creation. Hopefully without feeling regret that you didn’t use enough rubber bands like I did.
  6. Wash clothing in washing machine, alone. Do not be silly and wash it with other clothes.
  7. Dry dry dry.
  8. Take a selfie in the bathroom mirror.
  9. Never take it off because now you’re forever comfy AND cute.

A special thanks to my helper, baby A, who below is hiding the overly bleached shoulder that caused my regret of rubber band under-usage.

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