Real Estate

Look Inside This Green-Energy-Powered Modern Dream Home Near DC

Appropriately, it hit the market on Earth Day.

Photos by Chris Ellenbogen.

The sprawling six-bedroom house in Bethesda’s Bannockburn neighborhood has plenty of luxe features. Its nearly acre-sized lot, for instance, or its walls of windows, or the glass-enclosed home office that seems to float among the trees.

But some of its most impressive traits aren’t so easy to spot. Like the fact that it’s constructed almost entirely of aerated concrete blocks designed for exceptional thermal insulation. Or that it was positioned on its lot to capture the optimal amount of warmth from the sun. Or that it runs on a geothermal system that, despite the house’s more than 6,000 square feet, keeps monthly utility bills under $300.

When it was designed by architect William Feeney and built by PureForm, green energy was kind of the theme. So it’s only appropriate that the house hit the market Thursday morning—Earth Day. According to listing agent Dominique Rychlik, it has been “the perfect COVID work/school from home retreat” for the sellers, a family of five, who had the place built in 2015.

Rychlik says the sellers believe the home has the first full residential green roof constructed in Montgomery County. It covers two levels, and can be accessed from the primary bedroom wing.

Other unusual highlights include a wooden Japanese soaking tub and under-floor heat powered by hot water. Of course, all that Earth-friendliness doesn’t come with a particularly down-to-Earth price tag. The house is asking $3.1 million. Check out the full listing here.

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Senior Editor

Marisa M. Kashino joined Washingtonian in 2009 as a staff writer, and became a senior editor in 2014. She oversees the magazine’s real estate and home design coverage, and writes long-form feature stories. She was a 2020 Livingston Award finalist for her two-part investigation into a possible wrongful conviction stemming from a murder in rural Virginia.