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9 Corn Mazes to Try This Fall in the DC Area

Many of these spots have other quintessential fall activities as well.

Photo courtesy of Butler's Orchard

This piece was updated on August 31, 2022. It was originally published on October 5, 2021. 

While the District itself may have a dearth of corn mazes, luckily enough, there are several options for the delightfully meandering fall excursion nearby. So if you’re looking to get lost in a maze of maize, check out some of our picks below. 

Blue Ridge Mountain Maze
165 Old Ridge Rd., Lovingston, Va.
For anyone looking for a spookier maze experience this October, not only does this venue have a daytime corn maze, but also a nighttime one, with public campfire spaces and s’mores available to munch on. Tickets are $12 and under and $10 on Fridays from 12 PM to 6 PM. The maze is open from September 24 to November 7.

Butler’s Orchard 
22222 Davis Mill Rd., Germantown, Md.
Butler’s 42nd annual Pumpkin Festival not only features their twisted corn maze, but also live music, corn hole games, a corn box, and premium activities like face painting and pony rides for an additional cost. The festival goes from September 24 to October 30 with tickets ranging from $10 to $17. Buy tickets ahead of time for a $2 discount from walk up prices. 

Cox Farms 
15621 Braddock Rd., Centreville 
Enter the “Cornundrum” at your own risk, for a maze filled with pirates, jungles and more. The Centreville farm’s fall festival starts September 17 and runs through November 8, with attractions in addition to the maze such as numerous slides to slide down and numerous farm animals to feed. Tickets are available starting on September 1, and prices vary from $10 to $25.

Maryland Corn Maze 
389 Gambrills Rd., Gambrills, Md.
The corn maze takes on a new personality each year, debuting the dino-shaped Jurassic Maze this fall. After the maze, visit the general store or give the new zip line a try. The maze opens on September 17 with tickets ranging from $14 to $20. Bring your pooch on dog weekend (November 5 to November 6) for an autumnal adventure. 

Montpelier Farms
1720 Crain Highway North, Upper Marlboro, Md.
“The Amazing Bee” is the theme of this year’s Upper Marlboro maze. But if the 7-acre maze is a little too intense for you, try out the property’s smaller corn maze. The farm also features hayrides, playgrounds for the kiddos, and pumpkin bowling. General admission ranges from $12 to $18, and the maze is open from September 17 to November 8.

Summers Farm
5620 Butterfly Ln., Frederick
This Frederick farm takes corn mazes to a new level: The 5-acre maze is split into phases of increasing difficulty. You’ll also get a passport with clues on how to complete the labyrinth. According to the farm, some visitors take less than 30 minutes while others get stuck for hours. Open from September 17 to October 31, festival tickets range from $12.50 to $20.50.

Wayside Farm 
5273 Harry Byrd Highway, Berryville, Va.
Get lost (but not too lost!) in this farm’s Garfield and Odie-themed maze. Once you conquer the 10-acre pathway, enjoy a plethora of quintessential fall activities such as hayrides or pumpkin picking. The farm opens September 24, with tickets available between $12 and $25 per person.

Cornfusion Corn Maze
2020 Garrett Road, Manchester, Md.
The farm features a maze paying homage to Sherlock as well as other activities like an obstacle course, giant pumpkin corral, and straw jump. The maze opens on September 10—just in time for Grandparents Day, when grandparents get discounted tickets for the family all weekend long. Regular admission is $17 and the farm is open Saturdays and Sundays through October 29.

Liberty Mills Farm 
9166 Liberty Mills Road Somerset, VA 
You can choose from four different paths in this 34-acre maze. Routes include the Story Maze, the Trivia Maze, the Hole Punch Maze (the farm’s longest maze), and the Mystery Maze, where you won’t have any maps to guide you around. The walking puzzles are open from September 10 to November 11, and tickets range from $10 to $20.

Jason Fontelieu
Editorial Fellow
Maggie Hicks
Editorial Fellow