Shopping

Need a Massage RIGHT NOW? There’s an App for That.

Los Angeles-based app Soothe is here to help Washingtonians chill out, dude.
Image via Shutterstock/Rido.

Somewhere in the archives of my parent’s excessive video library of my siblings’ and my childhood, there’s a tape of my two-year-old self crooning that I wanted my dinner. And I wanted it “right noooowww!”

Every other week it seems, there’s another tech company popping up with some instant service app that caters to the two year old in all of us. Need a driver, right now? Try Uber. Need a blowout, right now? Try Veluxe. Need groceries, right now? Try Instacart.

The folks at Soothe, a Los Angeles-based app, have decided that Washingtonians need instant massages as well. The app recently expanded to ten cities across the United States, and Miami and Washington, DC were the only East Coast cities to make the cut.

Appointments can be made in advance or booked just an hour out, giving someone from Soothe’s team of background-checked and licensed massage therapists time to show up at your doorstep. Clients have the choice of four varieties of sessions, including deep tissue, Swedish, sports, and couples massages, as well as the ability to select the gender of their therapist. The prices are based on length of time and are comparable with other Washington salons and spas, with 60 minutes for $99, 90 minutes for $139, and two hours for $169.

Clients can book via the app, online, or over the phone, and therapists are available between 9 AM and midnight seven days a week—so the next time you’re heading home late with back pain after standing at a cocktail reception for two hours in stilettos, a Soothe massage therapist can meet you at your door.

Don’t miss a new restaurant again. Subscribe to our weekly newsletters.

Questions or comments? You can reach us on Twitter, via e-mail, or by contacting the author directly:
Associate Editor

Caroline Cunningham joined Washingtonian in 2014 after moving to the DC area from Cincinnati, where she interned and freelanced for Cincinnati Magazine and worked in content marketing. She currently resides in College Park.