Real Estate

Wizards Star Bradley Beal Just Bought this McLean Mansion

The exterior of Beal's new 11,150-square-foot mansion. Photos courtesy of MRIS.

Over the summer, Washington Wizards shooting guard Bradley Beal signed a deal worth about $128 million, making the 23-year-old the highest paid player in the team’s history. He recently spent some of that haul on a French Provincial-style mansion in McLean. The six bedroom, nine-bathroom house was originally listed for $3,495,000, but Beal bought it for $3.2 million last month.

Here’s a look inside.

beal-backyard
Surprisingly, the house does not come with a swimming pool. However, the expansive backyard has been pre-approved for one, so Beal can start building whenever he wants.
beal-bathroom
The master bathroom looks to be large enough for a six-foot, five-inch pro athlete.
beal-bunk-room
The mansion includes a bunk room with a chalkboard wall.
beal-dining-room
The formal dining room.
beal-family-room
A family room with coffered ceilings and a fireplace.
beal-foyer
A set of custom mahogany arched doors leads to a patio.
beal-gym
The house has a home gym. Obviously.
beal-kitchen-2
The bright kitchen includes a Wolf range and other professional grade appliances, along with a butler’s pantry.

beal-kitchen

beal-library
A library/home office with custom built-in shelving.
beal-master-suite
The master bedroom has a crystal chandelier and a wood-burning fireplace.
beal-outdoor-patio
An outdoor patio includes a sound system and a cast stone fireplace.
beal-theater
A home theater room ready to be outfitted with rows of recliners.

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Senior Editor

Marisa M. Kashino joined Washingtonian in 2009 as a staff writer, and became a senior editor in 2014. She oversees the magazine’s real estate and home design coverage, and writes long-form feature stories. She was a 2020 Livingston Award finalist for her two-part investigation into a possible wrongful conviction stemming from a murder in rural Virginia.