100 Very Best Restaurants: #92 – Mokomandy

Mokomandy's interior is sleek and minimalist. Photograph by Scott Suchman.

“Are you familiar with Korean and Cajun food?” our server asks before promptly instructing us to forget whatever we know. Thaddeus Kim and chef Daniel Wilcox Stevens offer their own takes on both cuisines—but not necessarily as fusion. Snack on coin-sized kimchee pancakes alongside cracklings so hot and fresh they’re still audibly crackling. One moment, you’ll be indulging in dumplings fattened with braised duck and foie gras; the next, you’ll be digging into fried slices of “shaved” catfish with rémoulade and pickled peppers—a different kind of chips and dip. It might sound a little all over the place, but the comfort food doesn’t feel like whiplash. Moderate.
Also great: Jambalaya; bone marrow with onion jam and brioche; short-rib lettuce wraps; mokokarae (curry) and pasta; beignets; chocolate pot de creme.

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Ann Limpert
Executive Food Editor/Critic

Ann Limpert joined Washingtonian in late 2003. She was previously an editorial assistant at Entertainment Weekly and a cook in New York restaurant kitchens, and she is a graduate of the Institute of Culinary Education. She lives in Logan Circle.

Anna Spiegel
Food Editor

Anna Spiegel covers the dining and drinking scene in her native DC. Prior to joining Washingtonian in 2010, she attended the French Culinary Institute and Columbia University’s MFA program in New York, and held various cooking and writing positions in NYC and in St. John, US Virgin Islands.

Jessica Sidman
Food Editor

Jessica Sidman covers the people and trends behind D.C.’s food and drink scene. Before joining Washingtonian in July 2016, she was Food Editor and Young & Hungry columnist at Washington City Paper. She is a Colorado native and University of Pennsylvania grad.