Real Estate

Looks Like Stephen Miller Can’t Find a Buyer for His DC Condo

It first hit the market in October.

Miller in 2016. Photograph by Flickr user Gage Skidmore.

Cue the tiny violins. It appears Stephen Miller, noted white nationalist and architect of Trump’s child-separation policy, hasn’t been able to unload his luxury condo at CityCenterDC.

Though media first reported on the listing in April, MLS records show that Miller actually started trying to sell the two-bedroom unit all the way back in October. He listed it then for $1,199,000. The condo was then taken off the market, and re-listed in April at the same price. In mid-May, the listing was withdrawn for a second time, and it remains off the market. Miller, meanwhile, has reportedly moved to Arlington with his wife, Katie Miller, another former Trump administration official.

The now defunct listing described the Miller home as filled with sunlight, and decked out with wide-plank floors, “sleek, wood cabinets,” and “natural finishes.” A “warm and contemporary kitchen” features Bosch appliances and a built-in banquette.

So, why hasn’t it sold? Sure, the DC condo market has been weakened by the pandemic—last month, condos spent a median of 14 days on the market, versus six days for all housing types in the DC area. But we’d wager the high-profile seller (who once claimed a DC bartender followed him into the street and flipped him the double birds, prompting Miller to throw away $80 worth of sushi) isn’t exactly reeling in local interest.

The condo’s listing agent, David Getson, declined to comment, other than to confirm the property is no longer on the market.

*This article has been updated.

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Senior Editor

Marisa M. Kashino joined Washingtonian in 2009 as a staff writer, and became a senior editor in 2014. She oversees the magazine’s real estate and home design coverage, and writes long-form feature stories. She was a 2020 Livingston Award finalist for her two-part investigation into a wrongful conviction stemming from a murder in rural Virginia.