Real Estate

Photos: The Wharf’s Phase Two Has Come A Long Way During the Pandemic

Take a look inside the waterfront development's under-construction second half.

A view up the Washington Channel toward the second phase of the Wharf. Photo courtesy of The Wharf, Washington, DC.

While stories about Covid-related construction delays and supply-chain disasters seem to be the norm these days, phase two of the Wharf is ahead of schedule, according to Matthew Steenhoek, senior vice president of development at Hoffman & Associates, the waterfront project’s co-developer.

During a recent tour of phase two, which sits southeast of the phase one buildings, Steenhoek shared that lighter traffic during the pandemic allowed trucks and materials to move more quickly to and from the job site. The cumulative effect was significant enough, he says, that it actually sped up the timeline. He says the whole second phase is slated to be open within about a year.

This stretch of the Wharf will complete the glittering mile of Southwest waterfront, whose first phase opened four years ago. Like the development’s existing half, phase two will include restaurants, a hotel, and residential buildings. It will also be home to big-name office tenants: prominent DC law firm Williams & Connolly and the Atlantic are both relocating there from their longtime headquarters.

The Williams & Connolly building is slated to open by spring, according to Steenhoek, while the Atlantic‘s offices will finish later in 2022. The Pendry—the Wharf’s fourth and highest-end hotel—is also on the way. Two of the new restaurant spaces sit atop piers directly over the water. Steenhoek says a lease has been signed for one, though he declined to name the restaurant. He says the other is in negotiations. (There will be additional restaurants inside the other phase two buildings.)

A recent aerial photo of the Wharf’s second phase. Photo courtesy of the Wharf, Washington, DC.
A rendering of how phase two will look when complete. The darker building in the foreground is the future Atlantic offices. The curved building behind it is the Amaris condos. All renderings courtesy of the Wharf, Washington, DC.

The last piece of phase two to finish will be the Amaris condos, an ultra-luxury, 96-unit building, where some penthouses are selling for more than $12 million and most residences have water views. Amenities include a “car elevator,” to deliver residents’ vehicles from the garage. Though it won’t be ready for move-ins until the fourth quarter of 2022, Michelle Giannini, an executive vice president at Hoffman, says the building is more than 35 percent sold.

Washingtonian got a tour inside the Amaris construction site. Here’s a peek at some of the building’s features now, compared to how they will look when they’re complete.

Amaris’s curved design is intended to maximize views from each condo. Photos by Marisa M. Kashino.
A rendering of the finished building. The curved glass is bent on-site via a process called cold-warping.
Every unit has an outdoor terrace.
The future car elevator.
And how it will look when complete. The car elevator, which will deliver residents’ vehicles into below-ground parking, will be staffed by a valet. The building will also have a 24/7 concierge.
The indoor saltwater lap pool, under construction.
A rendering of the finished product. Amaris has 20,000 square feet of amenity space, 7,000 of which will be devoted to health and wellness offerings like the pool.
The view from a penthouse unit.
The future dining and living space of one of the penthouses, with a sweeping view of the Washington Channel. Amaris has seven penthouses, four of which are already sold. The three remaining penthouses start at $4,920,000.

Best Real Estate Stories of the Week

Love DMV real estate? Us too!  Sign up here for our weekly Real Estate e-newsletter.
Or, see all of our newsletters. By signing up, you agree to our terms.
Senior Editor

Marisa M. Kashino joined Washingtonian in 2009 as a staff writer, and became a senior editor in 2014. She oversees the magazine’s real estate and home design coverage, and writes long-form feature stories. She was a 2020 Livingston Award finalist for her two-part investigation into a wrongful conviction stemming from a murder in rural Virginia.