Food

Where to Order Takeout and Delivery in Bethesda

Peking duck, chirashi bowls, José Andrés-approved sandwiches, and more.

Peking duck at Q by Peter Chang. Photograph by Scott Suchman
Coronavirus 2020

About Coronavirus 2020

Washingtonian is keeping you up to date on the coronavirus around DC.

COVID-19 hasn’t much diminished Bethesda’s dining scene, which is light on fine dining and heavy on family-friendly restaurants, chains, decades-old neighborhood institutions, and mom and pops. While a few places have temporarily closed, many have thriving takeout/delivery options. And in lots of cases, you can get beer, wine, and cocktails to go, too. A few of our favorites:

Alatri Bros.
4926 Cordell Ave., Bethesda
The wood-fired pizza place has a 20 percent off promotion going on Mediterranean small plates and pies like the Alsace (a pizza version of a tarte flambee) and Jorge’s Inferno, a mix of pepperoni, olives, and Fresno peppers. Pickup or delivery via Doordash.

Bangkok Garden
4906 St. Elmo Ave., Bethesda
The snug Thai institution is still offering its tangy soups, noodle dishes, spicy salads, and curries. Pickup or delivery via Postmates.

Chicken on the Run
4933 St. Elmo Ave., Bethesda
You can get family-style spreads—for up to eight people— of Peruvian chicken, plantains, and yucca here. Pickup or delivery via Doordash.

Jaleo
7271 Woodmont Ave., Bethesda
José Andrés’s tapas mainstay just reopened for delivery and pickup. There are cheese plates, jamon-and-manchego sandwiches, and an array of classic Spanish small plates (excellent gambas al ajillo). You can also get sangria, a gin and tonic, a couple wines, and beer.

Medium Rare’s culotte steak and fries. Photograph by Scott Suchman

Medium Rare
4904 Fairmont Ave., Bethesda
Mark Bucher’s steakhouse offers just one dinner: a $23.95 set menu of bread, green salad, and culotte steak and fries. What really makes it though, is the glorious sauce it comes with, which he is now selling by the quart. At brunch, there’s steak and eggs and French toast. Booze ranges from tequila shots to beer to chateauneuf du cape. Order for pickup or delivery via Doordash, Grubhub, and Postmates.

Olazzo
7921 Norfolk Ave., Bethesda
If you’re in the mood for meatballs, big red-saucy plates of pasta, and lots of other things from the Italian American playbook, this is your place. The chicken cardinale, with penne draped in creamy tomato sauce, is our usual order. Pickup or delivery via Doordash.

Kung pao chicken with peanuts at Q by Peter Chang. Photograph by Scott Suchman

Q by Peter Chang
4500 East-West Hwy., Bethesda
One of the top Peking ducks in town comes out of chef and Hubei native Peter Chang’s Bethesda flagship. Don’t miss the dumplings, dry-fried eggplant, and Szechuan-style kung pao chicken, either. Order for pickup or delivery via Caviar.

Raku
7240 Woodmont Ave., Bethesda
We’re big fans of the chirashi and the elaborately dressed sushi rolls at this pan-Asian spot. There are noodle soups, bigger fusion plates, and bottles of wine and sake, too.  It’s offering both curbside pickup and delivery.

Silver
7150 Woodmont Ave., Bethesda
The upscale diner (the sister to chain Silver Diner) balances comfort food indulgences (pickle-brined fried chicken sandwiches) with healthier options (salmon with asparagus). There are family-style dishes and lots of choices for brunch, including DIY mimosa kits. Curbside pickup and delivery.

The French dip at Woodmont Grill. Photograph by Scott Suchman

Vace
4705 Miller Ave., Bethesda
This tiny deli (and its Cleveland Park twin) are a favorite for frozen pastas and sauces, Italian pantry staples, hefty subs, and sturdy, sauce-on-top pizza. It’s open for regular carryout and is also on Postmates.

Woodmont Grill
7715 Woodmont Ave., Bethesda
The offshoot of the Hillstone chain is great for burgers (veggie and regular), nicely embellished salads, and sushi rolls. Curbside pickup only.

Don’t Miss Another New Restaurant—Get Our Food Newsletter

The latest in Washington’s food and drink scene.

Or, see all of our newsletters. By signing up, you agree to our terms.
Ann Limpert
Executive Food Editor/Critic

Ann Limpert joined Washingtonian in late 2003. She was previously an editorial assistant at Entertainment Weekly and a cook in New York restaurant kitchens, and she is a graduate of the Institute of Culinary Education. She lives in Logan Circle.